787 Dreamliner
Boeing confirms it has asked the FAA for permission to resume test flights as it seeks to solve the battery problems that have grounded the worldwide fleet of 787 Dreamliners. (AP image)

Boeing asks FAA to allow 787's back in air

Japan Airlines says the grounding of its fleet of Boeing 787s has cost it $7.5 million. Meanwhile, some Dreamliners have still taken to the air.

The New York Times reported the airline will seek compensation from Boeing once the 787 situation "settles down."

Boeing's bottom line will be hurt by the 787 groundings: Wall Street analysts and others have floated many numbers, from an estimated $350 million in direct expenses to a possible $5 billion write-off as a result of the Dreamliner grounding.

Still, several Boeing 787s have made flights in the last three weeks, despite the worldwide grounding of the new airplane.

The Wall Street Journal reported five Air India 787s were allowed to make one-way trips without passengers so they could be moved to the company's maintenance facility.

The move also allowed the airline to avoid steep parking charges for the airplanes which were taking up space at the airport in Delhi.

It's unknown how long the Dreamliner fleet will be grounded as investigators look for the cause of battery problems on the plane.

Meantime, Boeing confirms it has asked the FAA for permission to resume test flights as the company works to find a potential fix for the battery woes that have grounded the worldwide fleet, KING 5 reports.

You might also be interested in:
Former inspector general says FAA dropped the ball on Boeing batteries
NTSB says no cause found yet for Boeing 787 battery fire

KIRO Radio's Chris Sullivan and Linda Thomas contributed to this report.


KIRO Radio Staff, Staff report
Straight from the newsdesk.
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