Seattle's "superhero" Phoenix Jones avoids assault charges for now

Phoenix Jones
Outside the courthouse on Thursday morning, Seattle's superhero Phoenix Jones declared his true identity. He then walked off without taking questions from the media. (97.3 KIRO FM/Tim Haeck) | Zoom
Phoenix Jones might be off the hook for assault charges.

The city attorney declined to file charges against Seattle's self-proclaimed superhero on Thursday, but did say that the investigation is on-going.

During the hearing, a court officer asked Jones to remove his mask and he complied. He wore his superhero uniform under a button-down shirt.

Prosecutors told a judge they would need more time to decide whether to file charges in the case.

Outside the courthouse, Jones declared, "I am Phoenix Jones, I am also Ben Fodor. I am just like everybody else. The only difference is that I try to stop crime."

He then said he'd be out patrolling Thursday night and invited city leaders to 1st Ave. and Pike St. for a meet up on Saturday night.

Fodor, 23, was arrested Saturday for investigation of assault after allegedly using pepper spray to break up a fight in downtown Seattle.

A woman, who wishes to be identified as Maria and was involved in the incident is "furious" over the outcome.

She told Ross and Burbank on Thursday no one ever contacted her for a statement or to file a report. Maria claimed she continued calling police, but they kept telling her "it's in review."

Maria can be seen hitting Fodor with one of her shoes. She said there was no reason for him to interject because there was never a fight. She did admit that one man did get pushed, but nothing serious was going on. "This stuff happens all the time if you're in downtown Seattle, but there wasn't going to be anything too violent going on there."

Maria said even if there were, she still doesn't think Jones acted appropriately. "He had no right to just step in and pepper spray anyone."

Jones says he's sure someone was being hurt and needed his help.

In an interview with John Curley, Jones explained why he's willing to put himself in harm's way.

"If someone gets hurt, it probably should be me, rather than the average person. All of us are wearing bullet proofs, all of us have taken some sort of self defense training class. We all call 911 the minute the crime happens," he said.

Phoenix Jones Stops Assault from Ryan McNamee on Vimeo


Tim Haeck, KIRO Radio Reporter
Tim Haeck is a news reporter with KIRO Radio. While Tim is one of our go-to, no-nonsense reporters, he also has a sensationally dry sense of humor and it will surprise some to learn he is a weekend warrior.
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