Final goodbye: Roll call of some who died in 2013

(AP) - JULY:

William H. Gray III, 71. He rose to influential positions in Congress and was the first black majority whip. July 1.

Charles "Chuck" Foley, 82. His Twister game launched decades of awkward social interactions at parties. July 1.

Princess Fawzia, 92. Member of Egypt's last royal family and the first wife of Iran's later-deposed monarch. July 2.

Doug Engelbart, 88. Visionary who invented the computer mouse and developed other technology that has transformed the way people work, play and communicate. July 2.

Lo Hsing Han, 80. So-called "Godfather of Heroin," he faced financial sanctions for allegedly helping prop up Myanmar's brutal former military junta through illegal business dealings. July 6.

Pran, 93. India's legendary actor who played some of Bollywood's most memorable villains in a career that spanned six decades. July 12. Pneumonia.

Amar Bose, 83. Acoustic pioneer and founder and chairman of an audio technology company known for the rich sound of its tabletop radios and its noise-canceling headphones. July 12.

Cory Monteith, 31. Actor on the television show "Glee" who had struggled for years with substance abuse. July 13. Overdose of heroin and alcohol.

Willie Louis, 76. Witness who went into hiding after testifying at the Emmett Till trial about hearing the lynching victim's screams. July 18.

Helen Thomas, 92. Irrepressible White House correspondent who used her seat in the front row of history to grill nine presidents. July 20.

Dennis Farina, 69. Onetime Chicago cop who as a popular character actor played a TV cop on "Law & Order" during his wide-ranging career. July 22.

Emile Griffith, 75. Elegant world boxing champion whose career was overshadowed by the fatal beating he gave Bennie Paret in a 1962 title bout that darkened all of boxing. July 23.

Virginia Johnson, 88. Half of the husband-wife research team that transformed the study of sex in the 1960s and wrote two best-selling books on sexuality. July 24.

George P. Mitchell, 94. Billionaire Texas oilman, developer and philanthropist who was considered the father of fracking. July 26.

Lindy Boggs, 97. Former congresswoman and plantation-born Louisianan who fought for civil rights during nearly 18 years in Congress after succeeding her late husband in the House. July 27.

George "Bud" Day, 88. Medal of Honor recipient who spent 5 1/2 years as a POW in Vietnam and was Arizona Sen. John McCain's cellmate. July 27.

David "Kidd" Kraddick, 53. High-octane radio and TV host of the "Kidd Kraddick in the Morning" show. July 27.

William Warren Scranton, 96. Former Pennsylvania governor, presidential candidate and ambassador to the United Nations. July 28.

Harry F. Byrd, 98. Champion of racial segregation and fiscal restraint who followed his father into the U.S. Senate. July 30.

Berthold Beitz, 99. Honored for saving hundreds of Jews in occupied Poland during World War II, he became one of postwar West Germany's leading industrialists. July 30.

AUGUST:

George Duke, 67. Grammy-winning keyboardist and producer whose sound infused acoustic jazz, electronic jazz, funk, R&B and soul in a 40-year-plus career. Aug. 5.

Stan Lynde, 81. Western cartoonist and author who created the nationally syndicated "Rick O'Shay" comic strip. Aug. 6.

"Cowboy" Jack Clement, 82. Producer, engineer and songwriter who helped birth rock `n' roll and push country music into modern times. Aug. 8.

Laszlo Csatary, 98. Ex-police officer indicted in June by Hungarian authorities for allegedly abusing Jews and contributing to their deportation to Nazi death camps during World War II. Aug. 10.

Johan Friso, 44. Dutch prince who gave up his position in line to the throne after getting entangled in a scandal with his bride-to-be. Aug. 12. Complications from a skiing accident.

Jack W. Germond, 85. Portly, cantankerous columnist and pundit who covered 10 presidential elections and sparred with colleagues on TV's "The McLaughlin Group." Aug. 14.

Marich Man Singh Shrestha, 71. Last Nepalese prime minister to serve before protests ushered in the country's first democratic elections in the early 1990s. Aug. 15. Lung cancer.

Bert Lance, 82. Georgia banker who served as President Jimmy Carter's first budget director before departing amid an investigation of his banking activities. Aug. 15.

Jacques Verges, 88. Flamboyant lawyer nicknamed the "Devil's advocate" for his defense of former Nazis, terrorist bombers and notorious dictators. Aug. 15.

Rosalia Mera, 69. Seamstress who co-founded a clothing store in Spain that grew into one of the world's largest retail chains, she was Spain's richest woman. Aug. 15.

Florin Cioaba, 58. King of the Gypsies, he was a member of the family that has led Romania's embattled Roma minority since the 19th century. Aug. 18. Heart attack.

Albert Murray, 97. Influential novelist and critic who celebrated black culture, scorned black separatism and was once praised by Duke Ellington as the "unsquarest man I know." Aug. 18.

Lee Thompson Young, 29. Actor who as a teen starred in "The Famous Jett Jackson" and was featured in the film "Friday Night Lights" and the TV series "Rizzoli & Isles." Aug. 19. Apparent suicide.

Elmore Leonard, 87. Acclaimed crime novelist whose best-sellers and the movies made from them chronicled the violent deaths of many a thug. Aug. 20. Complications from a stroke.

C. Gordon Fullerton, 76. Former astronaut who flew on two space shuttle missions and had an extensive career as a research and test pilot for NASA and the Air Force. Aug. 21.

Julie Harris, 87. Much-honored Broadway performer whose roles ranged from the flamboyant Sally Bowles in "I Am a Camera" to the reclusive Emily Dickinson in "The Belle of Amherst." Aug. 24.

Muriel "Mickie" Siebert, 84. She started as a trainee on Wall Street and became the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. Aug. 24.

Robert R. Taylor, 77. He put soap in pump bottles and forever changed the way people wash up. Aug. 29. Cancer.

Seamus Heaney, 74. Ireland's foremost poet who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995. Aug. 30.

David Frost, 74. Veteran broadcaster who won fame around the world for his interview with former President Richard Nixon. Aug. 31.

SEPTEMBER:

Judith Glassman Daniels, 74. She blazed a trail for women in the publishing world and became the first woman to serve as top editor of Life magazine. Sept. 1. Stomach cancer.

Ronald Coase, 102. Nobel Prize winner and a pioneer in applying economic theory to the law. Sept. 2.

Frederik Pohl, 93. Over decades he gained a reputation of being a literate and sophisticated writer of science fiction. Sept. 2.

Rochus Misch, 96. Adolf Hitler's devoted bodyguard for most of World War II and the last remaining witness to the Nazi leader's final hours in his Berlin bunker. Sept. 5.

Demetrius Newton, 85. Attorney who represented Rosa Parks and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and became the first black person to serve as speaker pro tem of the Alabama House. Sept. 11.

Ray Dolby, 80. American inventor and audio pioneer who founded Dolby Laboratories. Sept. 12.

Chin Peng, 88. Tough former communist guerrilla who led a bloody but failed insurgency against British rule in Malaysia in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Sept. 16. Cancer.

Eiji Toyoda, 100. Member of Toyota's founding family who helped create the super-efficient "Toyota Way" production method. Sept. 17.

Ken Norton, 70. Former heavyweight champion who beat Muhammad Ali and then lost a controversial decision to him in Yankee Stadium. Sept. 18.

Marcel Reich-Ranicki, 93. He grew up in Poland and Nazi Germany, survived the Warsaw Ghetto and went on to become postwar Germany's best-known literary critic. Sept. 18.

Hiroshi Yamauchi, 85. He ran Nintendo for more than 50 years and led the Japanese company's transition from traditional playing-card maker to video game giant. Sept. 19. Pneumonia.

Michael Moses Ward, 41. One of two survivors of the 1985 bombing of the militant group MOVE in a Philadelphia neighborhood. Sept. 20. Apparent drowning aboard a cruise ship.

Alvaro Mutis Jaramillo, 90. Prolific Colombian writer and poet. Sept. 22.

Oscar Espinosa Chepe, 72. Cuban economist and diplomat who broke with Fidel Castro's government in the 1990s and was imprisoned for dissident activities. Sept. 23.

Ruth Patrick, 105. Scientist whose research on freshwater ecosystems led to groundbreaking ways to measure pollution in rivers and streams. Sept. 23.

Evelyn Lowery, 88. Pioneer in civil rights and women's empowerment and the wife of the Rev. Joseph Lowery. Sept. 26.

Harold Agnew, 92. Former Los Alamos National Laboratory director who led the effort to train the first group of international atomic inspectors. Sept. 29.

OCTOBER:

Tom Clancy, 66. His high-tech, Cold War thrillers such as "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games" made him the most widely read and influential military novelist of his time. Oct. 1.

Abraham Nemeth, 94. Blind designer of the internationally recognized Nemeth Braille Math Code that simplified symbols for easier use in advanced math and science. Oct. 2.

Vo Nguyen Giap, 102. Brilliant, ruthless commander who led outgunned Vietnamese to victory first over the French and then the Americans. Oct. 4.

Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, 93. Spiritual leader of Israel's Sephardic Jews who transformed immigrants from North Africa and Arab nations and their descendants into a political force. Oct. 7.

Mark "Chopper" Read, 58. One of Australia's most notorious and colorful crime figures. Oct. 9. Cancer.

Stanley Kauffmann, 97. Film critic for The New Republic for 50 years, author of plays and fiction, and editor who helped discover the novels "Fahrenheit 451" and "The Moviegoer." Oct. 9.

Scott Carpenter, 88. Second American to orbit the Earth and first person to explore both the heights of space and depths of the ocean. Oct. 10. Complications from a stroke.

Erich Priebke, 100. Former Nazi SS captain who evaded arrest for nearly 50 years after taking part in one of the worst atrocities by German occupiers in Italy during World War II. Oct. 11.

Wadih Safi, 92. Lebanese singer and composer whose strong, clear voice propelled him to fame throughout the Arab world. Oct. 11.

William H. Sullivan, 90. Diplomat who oversaw the "secret war" in Laos, helped negotiate an end to U.S. military involvement in Vietnam and was the last American ambassador to Iran. Oct. 11.

Takashi Yanase, 94. Creator of one of Japan's most beloved cartoon characters, Anpanman. Oct. 13.

Hans Riegel, 90. Longtime boss of German candy maker Haribo who took the gummi bear to international fame. Oct. 15.

Ed Lauter, 74. Character actor whose long, angular face and stern bearing made him instantly recognizable in scores of movies and TV shows over five decades. Oct. 16. Mesothelioma.

Sein Win, 91. Renowned journalist in Myanmar who championed press freedom and endured three stints in prison as he chronicled several decades of his country's turbulent history. Oct. 17.

Antonia Brenner, 86. American nun who was raised in Beverly Hills and abandoned a life of privilege to live in a notorious Mexican prison. Oct. 17.

Lou Scheimer, 84. He founded the Filmation animation studio that produced Saturday morning cartoons including "Fat Albert" and "The Archie Show." Oct. 17.

Bum Phillips, 90. Folksy Texas football icon who coached the Houston Oilers during their "Luv Ya Blue" heyday and later led the New Orleans Saints. Oct. 18.

Tom Foley, 84. Courtly former speaker of the U.S. House who lost his seat when Republicans seized control of Congress in 1994. Oct. 18. Complications from a stroke.

Bill Young, 82. Senior Republican in the U.S. House and a defense hawk who was influential on military spending during his 43 years in Washington. Oct. 18.

William C. Lowe, 72. Former IBM executive credited with helping to bring personal computers to the masses. Oct. 19. Heart attack.

Major Owens, 77. New York City Democrat who served 12 terms in the U.S. House and helped pass the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Oct. 21. Renal failure and heart failure.

Somdet Phra Nyanasamvara, 100. Thailand's Supreme Patriarch, who headed the country's order of Buddhist monks for more than two decades. Oct. 24.

Lou Reed, 71. Punk poet of rock `n' roll who profoundly influenced generations of musicians as leader of the Velvet Underground and remained a vital solo performer for decades after. Oct. 27.

Tadeusz Mazowiecki, 86. Eastern Europe's first democratic prime minister after communism, key adviser to Poland's Solidarity movement and U.N. human rights envoy to Bosnia. Oct. 28.

Ike Skelton, 81. He built a reputation as a military expert and social conservative during 34 years representing Missourians in the U.S. House. Oct. 28.

NOVEMBER:

Editta Sherman, 101. Photographer known as the "Duchess of Carnegie Hall" while living in a studio over the auditorium for six decades. Nov. 1.

George Magovern, 89. Pittsburgh cardiovascular surgeon who pioneered artificial heart valves. Nov. 4.

Charlie Trotter, 54. Award-winning chef and self-taught culinary master whose namesake Chicago restaurant elevated the city's cuisine and provided a training ground for top chefs. Nov. 5.

John Tavener, 69. British composer often remembered for the elegiac song performed as Princess Diana's coffin was carried out of Westminster Abbey. Nov. 12.

Glafcos Clerides, 94. Former president who guided Cyprus into the European Union and dedicated most of his 50 years in politics to trying to reunify the ethnically split island. Nov. 15.

Barbara Park, 66. Former class clown who channeled her irreverence into the million-selling mishaps of grade-schooler Junie B. Jones. Nov. 15.

Doris Lessing, 94. Nobel Prize-winning, often-polarizing author of "The Golden Notebook" and other novels that reflected her own improbable journey across the former British empire. Nov. 17.

Merrell Williams Jr., 72. Onetime paralegal who took on Big Tobacco as a whistleblower who leaked internal documents exposing health risks and the addictiveness of cigarettes. Nov. 18.

Diane Disney Miller, 79. Walt Disney's daughter and one of his inspirations for building the Disneyland theme park. Nov. 19.

Frederick Sanger, 95. British biochemist who twice won the Nobel Prize in chemistry and has been called the father of the genomic era. Nov. 19.

Joseph Paul Franklin, 63. White supremacist who targeted blacks and Jews in a cross-country killing spree from 1977 to 1980. Nov. 20. Executed.

Sylvia Browne, 77. Psychic who made frequent appearances on programs such as "Larry King Live" and "The Montel Williams Show." Nov. 20.

Michael Weiner, 51. Labor lawyer who took over as head of the baseball players' union four years ago and smoothed its contentious relationship with management. Nov. 21. Brain tumor.

Fred F. Scherer, 98. Painter who created vivid dioramas of animals and birds in natural scenes for the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Nov. 25.

Jane Kean, 90. Performer who got her start in musical theater but was best known as Trixie alongside Jackie Gleason on a TV revival of "The Honeymooners." Nov. 26.

Paul Walker, 40. Star of the "Fast & Furious" movie series. Nov. 30. Car crash.

Paul Crouch, 79. Televangelist who built what's been called the world's largest Christian broadcasting network. Nov. 30.

DECEMBER:

Edward J. "Babe" Heffron, 90. His World War II army service was recounted in the book and TV miniseries "Band of Brothers." Dec. 1.

Heinrich Boere, 92. He murdered Dutch civilians as part of a Nazi Waffen SS hit squad during World War II but avoided justice for six decades. Dec. 1.

Andre Schiffrin, 78. Editor who gave readers Art Spiegelman, Michel Foucault and Studs Terkel before he was forced out of commercial publishing in a battle between profits and literature. Dec. 1. Pancreatic cancer.

Ahmed Fouad Negm, 84. Egypt's "poet of the people" whose political verses in colloquial Arabic skewered the country's leaders and inspired protesters from the 1970s to today. Dec. 3.

Nelson Mandela, 95. Colossus of the 20th century who emerged from 27 years in prison to negotiate an end to white minority rule in South Africa and became that nation's first black president. Dec. 5.

Betty Quadracci, 75. Quad/Graphics Inc. co-founder who also was president of Milwaukee Magazine and a champion of the arts. Dec. 9.

Eleanor Parker, 91. She was nominated for Academy Awards three times for her portrayals of strong-willed women and played a scheming baroness in "The Sound of Music." Dec. 9. Complications from pneumonia.

Jang Song Thaek, 67. Uncle of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who was long considered the country's No. 2 power. Dec. 12. Executed.

Wilfred Billey, 90. A Navajo Code Talker, whose words are inscribed on congressional medals given to his group and who fought to have a World War II comrade recognized for his service. Dec. 12.

Peter O'Toole, 81. Charismatic actor who achieved instant stardom as the title character of "Lawrence of Arabia" and was nominated eight times for an Academy Award. Dec. 14.

Joan Fontaine, 96. Academy Award-winning actress who found stardom playing naive wives in Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion" and "Rebecca" and also was featured in films by Billy Wilder, Fritz Lang and Nicholas Ray. Dec. 15.

Harold Camping, 92. California preacher who used his evangelical radio ministry and billboards to predict the end of the world and then gave up public prophecy when his date-specific doomsdays did not come to pass. Dec. 15.

Ray Price, 87. One of country music's most popular and influential singers and bandleaders who had more than 100 hits. Dec. 16.

Graham Mackay, 64. SABMiller PLC chairman who helped guide the company from a South African industrial conglomerate into one of the world's biggest brewers. Dec. 18. Brain tumor.

Al Goldstein, 77. The publisher of Screw magazine who helped break down legal barriers against pornography and raged against politicians and organized religion. Dec. 19.

Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, 79. A Mexican drug czar disgraced by his arrest and conviction for aiding a powerful drug cartel. Dec. 19.

John S.D. Eisenhower, 91. The son of a five-star general turned president who forged his own career in the U.S. Army and then chronicled the history of the American military in numerous books. Dec. 21.

Edgar M. Bronfman Sr., 84. The billionaire businessman and longtime president of the World Jewish Congress, which lobbied the Soviets to allow Jews to emigrate and helped spearhead the search for hidden Nazi loot. Dec. 21.

Mikhail Kalashnikov, 94. His work as a weapons designer for the Soviet Union is immortalized in the name of the world's most popular firearm, the AK-47 assault rifle, which is often called "a Kalashnikov." Dec. 23.

___

Follow Bernard McGhee on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/BMcGhee13


(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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