Goats back to tidy steep Seattle slopes

Goats Seattle
Goats are back to clean up areas of growth in Seattle that have gotten a little out of control. (KIRO Radio/file) | Zoom

SEATTLE (AP) - The goats have returned to munch their way through the blackberry bushes, thistles, nettles and long grasses that thrive in many steep areas of downtown Seattle.

The Seattle Transportation Department hires the goat herd annually to help tidy up areas under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. The department says the areas are too steep for human crews to access easily and using the goats avoids the need for herbicides.

The herd of 120 goats started work Thursday. After about 10 days at one location, they'll be moved to another.

Agency spokeswoman Marybeth Turner says the goats from Rent a Ruminant arrived in a trailer via ferry from their Vashon Island home.


(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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