Fate of eagles unknown after WA group loses permit

FERNDALE, Wash. (AP) - The fate of 18 bald eagles is uncertain since the Washington rescue group that has been caring for them has lost its permit.

KOMO-TV reports ( http://is.gd/gn3TKj) officials at the Sardis Wildlife Center fears the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will seize and euthanize the eagles.

But the woman responsible for handing out migratory bird permits for the Fish and Wildlife service says the government will eventually take the birds from the rescue group, but does not intend to kill the animals.

The 18 eagles have been brought to the Sardis Wildlife Center over the past 20 years for a variety of reasons. They are released back into the wild if they can be.

Sharon Wolters runs the non-profit and said she's had paperwork problems with her IRS non-profit status and with Fish and Wildlife. That's what has caused the uncertainty about the eagles' future.

In addition to the bald eagles, the center also hosts other birds, including hawks, owls, vultures and even a seagull.

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Information from: KOMO-TV, http://www.komotv.com/


(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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