The 13-foot-tall sculpture of the Roman goddess Diana by Augustus Saint-Gaudens stands atop the Great Stair Hall after a yearlong restoration, Thursday, July 10, 2014, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia. The work originally crowned one of the early venues for New York's Madison Square Garden, where it served as a weather vane starting in 1893. After the building was demolished in 1925, the sculpture was put in storage _ its gilded surface severely worn down by the elements. The museum acquired it in 1932. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Philadelphia museum's golden goddess glows again

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- A symbol of the Philadelphia Museum of Art is once again looking radiant in bright shiny gold after a yearlong restoration.

It's the 13-foot-tall sculpture of the Roman goddess Diana in an archer's pose, ready to fire her arrow.

The sculpture has long held a place of prominence and honor in the museum's central hall.

The work by Augustus Saint-Gaudens (gaw-DEHNS') originally crowned an early venue for New York's Madison Square Garden, where it served as a weather vane starting in 1893.

After that building was demolished in 1925, the sculpture was put in storage -- its gilded surface severely worn down by the elements. The museum acquired it in 1932.

Museum officials said Thursday that 180 square feet of gold leaf was applied over the 700-pound work.

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