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A former FBI agent says the type of manhunt underway in Boston is unprecedented. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Former FBI agent says Boston manhunt unprecedented

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Authorities have shut down the city of Boston, suspending mass transit and asking people to stay indoors, as they conduct a massive search for the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. A former FBI agent familiar with manhunts says this level of search has never happened before in the U.S.

"I think the concentration of manpower and the fact that it's such an important case - it's unprecedented [...] with respect to what's going on in Boston where you basically are shutting down a city to go after this one guy," former FBI agent Gil Torrez tells 770 KTTH's David Boze.

The two suspects, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and Tamerlan's brother, Dzhokhar, 19 clashed with authorities late Thursday, killing an MIT police officer, and injuring a transit officer. The men were involved in firefight and threw explosive devices at police during their getaway attempt in a long night of violence that left one of them dead and another still at large Friday.

"He's proven he'll kill, has killed, so we need to neutralize him somehow," says Torrez.

While the search was underway for the surviving suspect Dzhokhar, 19, officials urged residents in Watertown, Newton, Arlington, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge and the Allston-Brighton neighborhoods of Boston to stay inside. At least a quarter of a million people live in those suburbs. All mass transit was shut down, and businesses were asked not to open Friday. People waiting at bus and subway stops were told to go home.

Torrez says the search so far has been an impressive demonstration of the collaborative efforts of city and state police, the FBI, and other agencies.

"It is a huge effort, and no one agency could have gone this far on their own."

From his experience, Torrez thinks the man they're chasing is not an established, well-trained terrorist.

"I think he's going to be more of a sick puppy, if you will, in the sense that he's turned into some kind of bitter individual and now he's lashing out at the country that opened their arms to take him in when he was a child."

The last update from state police said officers are searching door-to-door in Watertown, but have still not found the second bombing suspect.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

You might also be interested in:

A glance at the search for Boston bomb suspects
1 of 2 Mass. bomb suspects dead; suburbs shut down

Jamie Skorheim, MyNorthwest.com Editor
Whether it's floating on Green Lake, eating shrimp tacos at Agua Verde, or taking weekend drives out to the Cascades, she loves to enjoy the Pacific Northwest lifestyle as much as humanly possible.
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