Yahoo takes copyright law to top German court

BERLIN (AP) -- Yahoo says it has filed a complaint to Germany's highest court against a year-old law that broadened copyright protection for news material used on the Internet.

The law aims to protect the copyright of news articles and other material on the Internet, but allows the use of "single words or small text passages" without royalties. Internet firms warned before it came into effect that it would amount to a tax on search engines.

Sunnyvale, California-based Yahoo Inc. said Friday that the vagueness of the rules and the resulting "unreasonable" legal uncertainty forced it to take the legislation to Germany's Federal Constitutional Court. It argued that the law unconstitutionally limits Internet users' freedom of information.

It wasn't clear when the court might consider the complaint.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Top Stories

  • Stolen Celebration
    Thieves have stolen all the decorations for Seattle's popular Halloween Alley

  • Commitment
    A Boeing CEO says Everett's new 777X wing facility is a sign of commitment

  • All You Can Eat
    6 belt-loosening food challenges in Seattle you may not be man enough to complete
ATTENTION COMMENTERS: We've changed our comments, but want to keep you in the conversation.
Please login below with your Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Disqus account. Existing MyNorthwest account holders will need to create a new Disqus account or use one of the social logins provided below. Thank you.
comments powered by Disqus
Listen to the show
Hear GeekWire on KIRO Radio
Join Todd Bishop and John Cook weekends on KIRO Radio to talk Seattle technology.

Sign up for breaking news e-mail alerts from MyNorthwest.com
In the community
Do you know an exceptional citizen who has impacted and inspired others?
KIRO Radio and WSECU would like to recognize six oustanding citizens this year. Nominate them to be recognized and to receive a $2,000 charitable grant.