Weekdays at 12noon on 770 AM: The Truth
Michael Medved
AP: 988befdb-e528-4828-a733-6a15f89f9e17
Senator Dianne Feinstein of California argued, the new women Senators aren't driven by "testosterone" and "ego" and so can work more cooperatively with their colleagues. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

The "estrogen advantage" is no cure for gridlock

With more women elected to the Senate and House, giddy commentators have begun suggesting that more feminine perspectives could cure Washington gridlock.

As Senator Dianne Feinstein of California argued, the new women Senators aren't driven by "testosterone" and "ego" and so can work more cooperatively with their colleagues.

But when in history have women leaders proven so easy-going and collaborative?

Margaret Thatcher and Golda Meir were fierce and formidable, noted for imposing their will on others, not compromise and cooperation. Closer to home, Nancy Pelosi spent four years as House speaker, but never reached successfully across the aisle: she didn't get a single GOP vote for Obamacare or the Stimulus package.

In the end, voting for a woman because she's female is just as ridiculous as voting for a man because he's male.

ATTENTION COMMENTERS: We've changed our comments, but want to keep you in the conversation.
Please login below with your Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Disqus account. Existing MyNorthwest account holders will need to create a new Disqus account or use one of the social logins provided below. Thank you.
comments powered by Disqus
In the community
Do you know a student who stands out in the classroom, school and community?
Help make their dreams come true by nominating them for a $1,000 scholarship and a chance to earn a $10,000 Grand Prize. Brought to you by KIRO Radio and Comprehensive Wealth Management.

Do you know an exceptional citizen who has impacted and inspired others?
KIRO Radio and WSECU would like to recognize six oustanding citizens this year. Nominate them to be recognized and to receive a $2,000 charitable grant.