Chefs Tom Douglas and Thierry Rautureau bring you the latest on Seattle's dining scene
Seattle Kitchen
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"I always say grilling is an art, barbecue is a religion," says Tom Douglas. With barbecuing, "You put the lid on and you let it go, and you trust. You have faith that the fire and the smokes are doing their jobs." (AP)

Grilling secrets from Seattle Kitchen

The Seattle Kitchen staff decided there was really only one cooking technique appropriate for the holiday weekend.

"It's time to grill," said Seattle Kitchen Show host Tom Douglas.

The first big issue to tackle is 'what's the difference between grilling and barbecuing?' Seattle Kitchen agrees grilling is hot and fast, and barbecuing is low and slow.

"I always say grilling is an art, barbecue is a religion," said Douglas. With barbecuing, Douglas said, "You put the lid on and you let it go, and you trust. You have faith that the fire and the smokes are doing their jobs."

For grilling, he said it's more wham-bam, "It's much more of having the right sear, and getting it hot, and the right fire level."

Co-host Thierry Rautureau said one of the biggest mistakes he sees in grilling is not getting the grill hot enough.

"You need to hear that sssshhhhhh when you drop food on the grill," said Rautureau.

"Think about the last time you burned yourself and how much it hurt. That's what it should sound like. Kind of branding hot, you never see a dark gray branding iron. No, they are red hot," said Douglas.

There's one tool Douglas and Rautureau said you must have to be a good griller.

"You can't be a good barbecuer or griller without a thermometer," said Douglas.

"You cannot judge the temperature of a barbecue by just putting your hand in there," said Rautureau. "It's really impossible to know unless you have a thermometer."

Rautureau varies the heat based on what he's cooking. He starts out hot for meat, then adds more delicate veggies as it cools.

"Eggplant, zucchini, onions, broccoli Rabe," said Rautureau, "Olive oil, salt pepper, just very simply done, just put it on the grill. So delicious."

The whole team agrees if you're out there for the meat, you may as well do the whole dinner.

"The beauty of doing the grill is that it's all on the grill, that you're not messing around in the kitchen that much," said Seattle Kitchen contributor Katie O.

"I do think that's a good plan," said Douglas. "When you're planning a grill dinner, just make the whole thing out there."

Jamie Skorheim, MyNorthwest.com Editor
Whether it's floating on Green Lake, eating shrimp tacos at Agua Verde, or taking weekend drives out to the Cascades, she loves to enjoy the Pacific Northwest lifestyle as much as humanly possible.
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