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Seattle Kitchen Ingredients

Ingredient of the Week: Parsnips

Dakota Access pipeline protesters defy law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The months-long dispute over the four-state, $3.8 billion pipeline reached a crisis point when the protesters set up camp on land owned by pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners. The disputed area is just to the north of a more permanent and larger encampment on federally-owned land where hundreds of protesters have camped for months. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

If you can pick up some parsnips that have been left in the ground through the frost cycles, chefs Tom Douglas and Thierry Rautureau say you’ll be pleasantly delighted. “They’re like eating candy!” Tom says.

Tom recommends picking up some apples to go with your parsnips. “I make a parsnip and apple hash,” he says, where he dices the apples and parsnips into small pieces and cooks them over high heat to caramelize the sugar.

Thierry, on the other hand, suggests shaving the parsnips thinly to make a salad. “It goes well with a little spice,” he says, but cautions you against using the center, as it becomes woody after the winter.

Whole Foods Markets are a proud sponsor of Seattle Kitchen’s Ingredient of the Week.

About the Author

Cait Walsh

Caitlyn Walsh is a regular lifestyles contributor for MyNorthwest. She enjoys reading and hiking, as well as perusing all the cat videos the Internet has to offer.


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