Listen to Ross and Burbank weekdays on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM
Ross+Burbank
hillaryclinton_bengahzitestimony.jpg
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The testimony you didn't hear

Yesterday Secretary of State Clinton testified about her response, some members of Congress would say her insufficient response, to the September 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi that left ambassador Chris Stevens and three others dead.

When one senator demanded yet again to know why she didn't immediately identify it as a terrorist attack she demonstrated that she had fully recovered from her concussion.

"The fact is, we had four dead Americans. Was it because of a protest? Or was it because guys out for a walk one night decided that they'd go kill some Americans? What difference at this point does it make?"

That got punditocracy speculating that her retirement might include some leisure time in Iowa and New Hampshire.

But what most of the coverage ignored was her warning that the chaos in Libya had consequences beyond the attack on the consulate. It also unlocked Muammar Gaddafi's immense arsenal of weapons - weapons that are now flowing throughout the middle east and into areas of North Africa that look a little too much like Afghanistan.

"Because if you look at the size of northern Mali, if you look at the topography it's not only desert it's caves," said Clinton.

Caves in the desert. A tribal culture which hasn't changed much in 2000 years. So while some senators obsess over what happened in Benghazi last September, an identified terrorist group, Al Qaeda in Northern Mali, is busy establishing a new safe haven.

Said, Clinton, "People say to me all the time, 'AQIM hasn't attacked the United States.' Well, before 9/11, 2001 ..."

Say no more.

Dave Ross, KIRO Radio Morning News Anchor
Dave Ross hosts the Morning News on KIRO Radio weekdays from 5-9 a.m. Dave has won the national Edward R. Murrow Award for writing five times since he started at KIRO Radio in 1978.
ATTENTION COMMENTERS: We've changed our comments, but want to keep you in the conversation.
Please login below with your Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Disqus account. Existing MyNorthwest account holders will need to create a new Disqus account or use one of the social logins provided below. Thank you.
comments powered by Disqus
In the community
Do you know a student who stands out in the classroom, school and community?
Help make their dreams come true by nominating them for a $1,000 scholarship and a chance to earn a $10,000 Grand Prize. Brought to you by KIRO Radio and Comprehensive Wealth Management.

Do you know an exceptional citizen who has impacted and inspired others?
KIRO Radio and WSECU would like to recognize six oustanding citizens this year. Nominate them to be recognized and to receive a $2,000 charitable grant.