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Dori now has a house divided: after an entire family full of Huskies, he's now got a daughter at Washington State University. (MyNorthwest.com/File)

Dori takes his youngest daughter to college

Taken from the Tuesday edition of the Dori Monson Show.

I took my youngest daughter off to college this weekend. There are so many things at play here for me as a dad, for me as part of a family. My wife and I met at the University of Washington. Our oldest daughter graduated from the UW. Our middle daughter is going to be a sophomore at the UW. And my youngest daughter...is a Cougar.

We took her over to Washington State University. Want to hear something unbelievable? In all my years, many of which I covered sports, I had never, ever been to Pullman before taking my daughter there. And it's a long ways away from everything.

I've always been one of those Husky snobs. The UW is part of Seattle. Pullman reminded me a little bit of Ann Arbor, where we took our daughter to look at the University of Michigan, where the campus is everything. It's it. It just feels like college, and my daughter's already, in two days, made fantastic friends. She's having the time of her life.

I was incredibly sad saying goodbye. Did I cry? Oh yeah. And I made her feel real awkward. I'm walking down the dorm hallway. I'm looking to see if other parents are there and I'm wiping my eyes. Every other parent is steeling up and I'm just a blubbering fool. I'm misty eyed now.

I don't believe in living life with regrets, and I think it's really selfish to have regrets because my life is really wonderful now, and everything that happened before is a part of that. But if there is one regret it's that I couldn't afford to live on campus.

Because my daughter was just having a blast! And my two older girls lived in sororities; it's like fantasy land. I lived at home all five years. I'm really glad that my kids are able to live on campus because that is one part of life that I completely missed out on.

It's not that Pullman is a million miles away - which it is - but I probably won't see this one any less or much less than the ones who went to school here in Seattle because you just have to let them go and live their life.

I like the kids going to school around here because my thinking is, if they meet someone that they're going to marry, it's a better chance of him being local and a better chance of seeing my grand-kids. My wife disagrees with me. My wife's attitude is let them go, let them spread their wings. If they go far away, that's wonderful. She feels like we'll stay close no matter how far away they go.

But you know who the luckiest parents in the world are? Homer and Marge Simpson. It's been 25 years, and the kids haven't aged a day.

Related:

WSU's drinking policy is just fine with Dori
This fall WSU parents will get a call if their students get drunk

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