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980 fast food AP
The effort for a $15 an hour minimum wage for fast food workers intensifies Thursday when they will go on strike in 100 cities across the country including several here in the Puget Sound area. (AP Photo/file)

Striking fast food workers' mindset is formula for bondage

Taken from Wednesday's edition of The Dori Monson Show.

The effort for a $15 an hour minimum wage for fast food workers intensifies Thursday when they will go on strike in 100 cities across the country including several here in the Puget Sound area.

The push is on and I will tell you, this story is so frustrating to anybody with half a brain because you see what is happening here. A lot of people don't really understand what is going on here. But I do. I understand exactly what is going on because I grew up in a household that had the mentality of, I wish somebody would give us something. And I saw early on, I recognized that that was a formula for bondage for the rest of your life.

If your life is centered around give me something, instead of being centered around I'm going to go create opportunities for myself - I kind of figured out when I was about 15-years-old I could either become a leach. I could continue this attitude that I was kind of raised with, quite frankly. I could either continue to be a leach and just whine about how unlucky I am and how unfair life is - you grow up poor, you have no shot, you have no connections, you have nothing - I could either be that person, or I could say, you know what, I'm going to bust loose from that.

I'm convinced the only way you can succeed in life is if you, at some point, decide I'm going to break loose from bondage.

Last night, I was driving and I turned on, of course, KIRO Radio, and Jason Rantz was hosting and he had a montage of fast food workers. This is a group of people in this montage - this is going to sound harsh - but this is a group of losers.

When I listened to these fast food workers in this montage, I thought these people have no shot. These people are life's losers and they will be forever, not because life is unfair, and not because their employer is not giving them enough money, but because what is inside their brain, and their heart, and their soul. They have no idea that they have to break free from bondage themselves. Here's what the fast food workers talking about the strike coming up Thursday had to say:

"It's crap. They make billions of dollars each year and when our registers be filled with thousands of dollars and they can't up our rate," said one woman who says she makes $7.40 an hour.

"I'm really tired of it already. Sometimes I work off the clock and my manager will get mad at me if I don't do what he says," said another man.

My manager will get mad at me if I don't do what he says. Does he think that that is unusual? My manager gets mad at me if I don't do what he says. Your manager gets mad if you don't do what he says. This guy is acting like this is some huge burden in his life, 'My manager gets mad at me if I don't do what he says.'

And then all of these people who are complaining about - I've got to work a second job. If I'm only making this much, I've got to work a second job. What is wrong with working a second job?

I literally cannot remember one moment in my life since I was 17 years old, when I only worked one job. Even today, I've arrived at a place where I'm comfortable. I certainly could get by on my radio salary.

My wife was pointing out to me a few days ago - and I'm kind of the extreme in the opposite direction - but there is about a six week period every year, from mid-November to the end of the year where I work roughly 105 hours a week, about 17 hours a day.

This show takes about 60 hours a week. The Seahawks stuff takes about 15. Coaching high school basketball takes about 30. You add it all up, it's about 105 hours a week. And I don't complain about that.

So big deal. Big deal that these people are complaining that because they might have to get a second job and work 50 or 60 hours a week. Sorry, that is the work ethic that allows you to succeed in life.

And for this guy to complain because his manager gets mad at him if he doesn't do what the manger says, that's just insanity here.

"Honestly I hate them, but it's a job for now," said the other woman in the fast-food worker montage.

I have never been ungrateful for a job that I had. When I was selling Time Life Books when I was 17 years old, that job sucked. I never hated jobs. I was always grateful, and the fact that this woman is willing to go on television and say I hate the people that have employed me, she has no chance in life.

If you are willing to go on TV and say I hate my employer. You are a, a loser, and b, you are consigned to a life of loserdom. That is not how you succeed in life. Who is going to want to hire this woman? If she ever acquired the job skills to qualify for more than a minimum wage job, who would hire her with that attitude? I would never hire that woman in a million years.

But this is the mentality because the labor unions and government, they want these people in bondage. They want them just scraping by, but they have to go to the unions to get any benefit they can get, and they have to go to government so that they can get their Obamaphone, and their Obamacare, and Obama will pay their mortgage, and Obama will put gas in their tank.

They are losers and that is why I'm frustrated. Go ahead, do your fast food strike. I'll absolutely stop eating fast food. You can destroy your business and then see if you can get $15 an hour doing something else. Good luck to this crowd.

Taken from Wednesday's edition of The Dori Monson Show.

JS

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