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The effects of climate change in the year 2038, according to Cliff Mass

(City of Seattle image)

If only there was a way to travel to the future and report back to prevent our demise.

In his latest blog post, University of Washington Professor of Atmospheric Sciences Cliff Mass writes as if it’s 2038 and we’re suffering with poor environmental decisions.

“It is the year 2038,” Mass begins. “The global warming problem has been conquered, but environment crises still plague mankind.”

If he’s right, Mass predicts the Gates and Bezos foundations will be major players in funding the solution, which is a “large-scale viable fusion energy plant by Helion Energy of Seattle.”

RELATED: How climate change will affect the Pacific Northwest

“It turned out that pulsing the magnetic containment fields, coupled with substantial computational resources and rapid-response control systems, was the secret.”

Congrats to Seattle for being at the forefront of solving a global issue.

And within 10 years, Helion’s system replaces fossil fuel plants, CO2 drops, and the world begins to cool to the levels of 1985. That was easy. Crisis averted, right? Not so fast.

Mass explains lowering carbon levels is only part of the solution.

Four examples of global crises we’ll be living within a mere 20 years are massive wildfires, loss of soils, dying oceans, and a lack of fresh water. Cliff says the wildfires — to match that of the Big Burn of 1910 — will be a result of mismanagement of forests, fire suppression, the spread of flammable invasive species, and a population boom. All while politicians blame them on global warming. Poor farming practices and polluting oceans will play a role.

Mass: Sea level rise is not from climate change, so far

Mass says the problem even exists within the environmental community that is fixated on global warming rather than the bigger issue: sustainability of the human race on Earth.

“It was particularly convenient that while a lot of folks talked, few did anything meaningful about global warming anyway,” Mass wrote.

If Mass is right about 2038, is 2018 too late to ask what can be done?

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