Andrew Walsh - Nights on KIRO Radio
Andrew Walsh
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A new study indicates 51 percent of those surveyed in a relationship would "Netflix cheat" on their spouse by watching an episode ahead in a series they'd agreed to watch together. (Image courtesy Netflix)

Survey indicates 28 million U.S. adults would confess to Netflix cheating

Does the next episode of that addictive TV show sometimes prove too tempting to wait for your partner? A new survey indicates 51 percent of those in a relationship would "Netflix cheat" on their spouse by watching an episode they'd agreed to watch together, and 12 percent admit they've already cheated.

KIRO Radio host Andrew Walsh admits he's committed Netflix adultery when his girlfriend is away on a business trip.

"Your partner has to travel for business and you're home alone and you're like 'well, what I want to watch is 'House of Cards,'" says Andrew. "There's a card-shaped hole in my heart right now, and I'm just going to watch this, but what I will do, is maybe when she comes back, I'll just pretend like I didn't watch it and I'll be all surprised about it."

Twelve percent of respondents to the survey say they've engaged in this "faking it" behavior.

Producer Nick Jarin says he and his girlfriend have both been guilty of Netflix cheating. He's even cheated on others. "I've Netflix cheated on my brother, too, when we're supposed to watch shows together."

Jarin admits to almost Netflix cheating on his girlfriend this very week after they were only able to watch half of the new episode of 'Game of Thrones' because she had to run off to work.

"That is the worst," says Walsh. "So you started watching it this morning and she said, 'Well time to turn off the TV, I've got to go to work.' And you're half way through the act of watching 'Game of Thrones.'"

The survey shows more men are guilty of Netflix cheating, with over 77 percent of men asked in the survey saying they would cheat on their partner. Only 57 percent of women in the same age group, 18-34, indicated they would cheat.

Younger couples also seem more likely to commit 'adultery,' with 26 percent of 18-34 year olds saying they would cheat compared to 10 percent among those in relationships over age 55.

Netflix acknowledges letting their members watch content whenever they want may be contributing to the problem. Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos released a statement regarding the issue:

"Netflix can't be held responsible for any trust issues, lovers' spats, or marital troubles that arise from watching ahead of your partner. We also will not cover any therapy sessions. As always, we advise to Watch Responsibly."

The survey was conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of Netflix.

Jamie Skorheim, MyNorthwest.com Editor
Whether it's floating on Green Lake, eating shrimp tacos at Agua Verde, or taking weekend drives out to the Cascades, she loves to enjoy the Pacific Northwest lifestyle as much as humanly possible.
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