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Politics

Supreme Court case to shape Ferguson investigation

The moment Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson shot an unarmed teenager, a 25-year-old Supreme Court case became the prism through which his actions will be legally judged.

Slaying of American reopens debate on ransoms

By rejecting demands for a nine-digit payment to save kidnapped American journalist James Foley, the United States upheld a policy choice that some European and Arab governments have long found too wrenching to make themselves: ruling out ransom to rescue any citizen held captive by militant organizations, in hopes the tough stand will make Americans safer from kidnapping and attacks by extremists.

Ryan says he'd love to see Romney run again

U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan said Thursday he would love to see Mitt Romney run again for president and teased the GOP's former nominee at one point that the "third time's the charm."

Former AP photo editor Toby Massey dies

Toby Massey, a photographer and photo editor who directed coverage of presidents and political conventions as well as natural disasters, the space program and sporting events during a 38-year career with The Associated Press, died Thursday. He was 80.

Foley case lays bare debate over paying ransom

The beheading of freelance journalist James Foley has forced a new debate between the longtime U.S. and British refusal to negotiate with terrorists, and Europe and the Persian Gulf's increasing willingness to pay ransoms in a desperate attempt to free citizens. The dilemma: How to save the lives of captives without financing terror groups and encouraging more kidnappings.

GAO: Pentagon violated law with Bergdahl swap

The Pentagon broke the law when it swapped Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a prisoner in Afghanistan for five years, for five Taliban leaders, congressional investigators said Thursday.

Bank of America settlement likely to benefit few

Bank of America's record $16.65 billion settlement for its role in selling shoddy mortgage bonds -- $7 billion of it geared for consumer relief -- offers a glint of hope for desperate homeowners.

Pentagon: Islamic State militants will regroup

U.S. airstrikes have helped Iraqi and Kurdish forces regain their footing in Iraq, but the well-resourced Islamic State militants can be expected to regroup and stage a new offensive, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Thursday.

Colorado's Mark Udall gets ad boost in Senate race

Republican Senate hopeful Cory Gardner's opposition to abortion rights "is way too extreme for Colorado," women voters say in ads Senate Democrats' campaign arm began running Thursday.

US 'concerned' by arrest of American in Israel

The U.S. government has raised concerns about Israel's arrest of a Palestinian teenager with American citizenship whose cousin was burned to death by Israeli extremists earlier this summer.

Supreme Court case to shape Ferguson investigation

It started with a bottle of orange juice 30 years ago.

Study: Combining vaccines boosts polio immunity

New research suggests a one-two punch could help battle polio in some of the world's most remote and strife-torn regions: Giving a single vaccine shot to children who've already swallowed drops of an oral polio vaccine greatly boosted their immunity.

Perry presses for greater US involvement in Iraq

Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Thursday pressed for a more aggressive U.S. military response in Iraq to combat Islamic state militants, including a sustained air campaign, and signaled he would support sending American ground troops.

New restrictions on hydrocodone to take effect

The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing hydrocodone, the highly addictive painkiller that has grown into the most widely prescribed drug in the U.S.

US diplomats barred from ice bucket challenge

The charity stunt has lured athletes, celebrities, politicians and rock stars and gone viral on the Internet, but don't look for U.S. diplomats to get in on the fun.

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