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Politics

AP Exclusive: US changing no-fly list rules

The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel.

Rights groups call for openness in Brown case

More than a dozen civil and human rights groups are appealing for openness in the investigation of the police shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

AP Exclusive: US changing no-fly list rules

The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel.

Uber hires former Obama adviser Plouffe

President Barack Obama's former campaign manager and White House senior adviser David Plouffe is joining car service startup Uber as it seeks to expand in cities worldwide.

RNC chair: Minority outreach must be full time

A GOP effort to send hundreds of party workers into minority communities across the country will continue long after this year's midterm elections are over, the chairman of the Republican National Committee said Tuesday.

AP Exclusive: US changing no-fly list rules

The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel.

National Mall to get 6-acre sand, soil portrait

The Smithsonian says it has commissioned a portrait made out of sand and soil that will stretch over six acres at the National Mall.

AP Interview: Ryan discusses father's alcoholism

At age 15, Paul Ryan was already feeling isolated from his father, who had grown distant from his family and leaned heavily on whiskey. Then one morning the future congressman found his alcoholic father in bed, dead from an apparent heart attack at age 55.

Defiant Texas Gov. Perry coming to New Hampshire

The last time voters in New Hampshire saw Rick Perry, the Texas governor's 2012 presidential bid had fallen apart after a series of gaffes punctuated by a much-maligned stumble during a televised debate.

Many communities still mistrust police

For one night, all was well in Ferguson, Missouri. After a change in police command, violent protests decrying the shooting death of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown at the hands of white police officer Darren Wilson suddenly gave way to peaceful demonstrations.

New report warns of anti-aircraft weapons in Syria

Warnings from an international research group and the Federal Aviation Administration underscore the rising threat to commercial aircraft posed by hundreds of anti-aircraft weapons that are now in the arsenals of armed groups in Syria and could easily be diverted to extremist factions.

As protests rage, Obama struggles to find his role

When racial tensions erupted midway through his first presidential campaign, Barack Obama came to Philadelphia to decry the "racial stalemate we've been stuck in for years." Over time, he said, such wounds, rooted in America's painful history on race, can be healed.

Rove-backed Crossroads adds Colo. to fall TV plan

The Republican establishment's favorite political machine is adding Colorado to the states where it will be advertising this fall, booking more than $6 million in television time and taking its post-Labor Day media budget to more than $26 million.

TSA to train officers on recognizing DC licenses

Transportation Security Administration workers will be getting training on how to recognize District of Columbia driver's licenses and identification cards.

US blacklists Gaza-based extremist group

The Obama administration has placed a Gaza-based extremist group on several terrorism blacklists, freezing any assets it may have in U.S. jurisdictions and barring Americans from transactions with it.

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