Bad food, slivers of sun: Life in Sydney’s hotel quarantine

Aug 17, 2021, 6:35 AM | Updated: 7:25 pm
Associated Press photographer Mark Baker takes photos outside his hotel window during his 14 days o...

Associated Press photographer Mark Baker takes photos outside his hotel window during his 14 days of isolation in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 12, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020, Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

(AP Photo/Mark Baker)

              Construction workers attach chains to lift equipment on a construction site in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 12, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020, Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Various items lie on the roof of a nearby building that have been dropped out of the windows of a isolation hotel in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 11, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A man sits in the sun outside a building in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 13, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A garbage collector returns a bin to a business in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 13, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A tradesman carries timber to a construction site in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 13, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A traffic controller outside a construction site stretches her legs in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 13, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Televisions illuminate in apartments in central Sydney on Aug. 15, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Late afternoon light illuminates buildings in the central business district in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 11, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A couple take photos on a balcony of their inner city apartment in Sydney, Australia, on Aug. 14, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A woman works late into the evening in an inner city office in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 12, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020, Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A parking warden places a ticket on a car in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 13, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Late afternoon light illuminates a small strip of an apartment building in the central business district in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 11, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              A traffic controller moves a road cone outside a construction site in central Sydney, Australia on Aug. 11, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Cars are reflected in the windows of an office in the central business district in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 11, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Workmen renovate an inner city office in the central business direct of Sydney on Aug. 17, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Meals delivered to my hotel room with that night's dinner and breakfast for the following morning at an isolation hotel in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 13, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
            
              Associated Press photographer Mark Baker takes photos outside his hotel window during his 14 days of isolation in Sydney, Australia on Aug. 12, 2021. Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020, Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense, approximately US$2,400. Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like, and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

SYDNEY (AP) — With our long journey to reach Australia behind us, and 14 days isolated in a hotel ahead of us, the police officer on our bus tried to inject some humor: “If you’re looking to save some money on the hotel,” he joked, “this is your last chance to hook up and share a room.”

As a photographer for The Associated Press, I had spent the past 20 days in Japan covering the Olympics. In a bid to limit transmission of COVID-19, officials imposed tough rules on visiting media and athletes that kept us in an “Olympic bubble” for our first 14 days in Tokyo. During that time, we were only allowed to move between the main media center, Olympic venues and our hotel; our meals were mostly from convenience stores. On Aug. 9, I returned to Australia, where I faced another 14 days in a hotel bubble.

Australia shut its borders to the world shortly after the pandemic erupted in 2020. Most Australians who want to travel abroad — be it for work, or to move, or to visit a dying family member in another country — must apply for permission from the government to leave Australia. Those lucky enough to be granted permission to travel must then spend two weeks quarantining in a hotel when they return, at their own expense — approximately US$2,400. The system has stranded tens of thousands of Australians abroad, as there are a limited number of quarantine hotel rooms available, and thus a limited number of Australians are allowed to return home each week.

Many have wondered what these quarantine hotels are like — and how those of us cloistered inside pass the time during those 14 days.

After landing in Sydney, we were welcomed by friendly local health officials who ushered us through customs and baggage collection and then onto the bus, where the jovial police officer ran through what to expect over the next two weeks. We were checked into the hotel one at a time, and then finally — three hours after landing — I walked into my room.

I was lucky enough to be placed in a one-bedroom apartment with every luxury included — a washing machine, two TVs and a kitchen. A friend dropped off gym equipment for me, and I rented an exercise bike to try and meet some fitness goals.

The provided meals are the biggest challenge. After two weeks of convenience store food in Japan, the grim, plastic-wrapped meals that arrive three times a day aren’t a whole lot better. The meals vary daily, but there is no choice.

My savior has been my wife, who every few days has delivered some great food and wine (we are allowed one bottle per day — more than enough for me!). Her deliveries have made my time here bearable.

My Olympics colleagues who are in other quarantine hotels across Australia are all experiencing slightly different conditions. None appear to be as lucky as me with the room, though some have better food options — even a choice!

As a photographer, I have passed much of my time documenting the world outside my window. Though Sydney is normally a bustling and vibrant city, a COVID-19 outbreak has forced residents into lockdown for the past two months. Life in the streets below is now quiet.

I perk up when I spot hints of normality: garbage trucks, parking inspectors, food delivery staff, a few office workers. I see the sun for around one hour a day as it passes between tall office towers.

The hotel staff have been wonderful. I enjoy my daily “mental health” calls from the in-house nurses. Less enjoyable are the three “up your nose” coronavirus tests we do on days 3, 7 and 12. Once I have completed my time here, I will have had nearly 30 such tests in the past six weeks.

As I pass the halfway mark, I have sets my sights on seeing my wife in person and not just from a balcony. I’m also looking forward to a hot, home-cooked meal and stretching my legs during a walk in the sunshine.

And I am really looking forward to a day when the toughest part of coming home to Australia is the long plane ride to get here.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Bad food, slivers of sun: Life in Sydney’s hotel quarantine