Analysts: Russian missiles seek to levy pain, could backfire

Oct 9, 2022, 8:13 PM | Updated: Oct 10, 2022, 9:51 am
People work to remove debris from a damaged house after an overnight Russian shelling, in Sloviansk...

People work to remove debris from a damaged house after an overnight Russian shelling, in Sloviansk, Donetsk region, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. The Russian missiles that rained down Monday on cities across Ukraine, bringing fear and destruction to areas that had seen months of relative calm, are an escalation in Moscow's war against its neighbor. But military analysts say it’s far from clear whether the strikes mark a turning point in a war that has killed thousands of Ukrainians and sent millions fleeing from their homes. (AP Photo/Andriy Andriyenko)

(AP Photo/Andriy Andriyenko)

              People work to remove debris from a damaged house after an overnight Russian shelling, in Sloviansk, Donetsk region, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. The Russian missiles that rained down Monday on cities across Ukraine, bringing fear and destruction to areas that had seen months of relative calm, are an escalation in Moscow's war against its neighbor. But military analysts say it’s far from clear whether the strikes mark a turning point in a war that has killed thousands of Ukrainians and sent millions fleeing from their homes. (AP Photo/Andriy Andriyenko)
            
              People receive medical treatment at the scene of Russian shelling, in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. The Russian missiles that rained down Monday on cities across Ukraine, bringing fear and destruction to areas that had seen months of relative calm, are an escalation in Moscow's war against its neighbor. But military analysts say it’s far from clear whether the strikes mark a turning point in a war that has killed thousands of Ukrainians and sent millions fleeing from their homes. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
            
              A firefighter stands next to a damaged bus after a Russian attack in Dnipro, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
            
              Firefighters try to extinguish a burning car after a Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. Russia unleashed a lethal barrage of strikes against multiple Ukrainian cities Monday, smashing civilian targets including downtown Kyiv where at least six people were killed amid burnt-out cars and shattered buildings. The onslaught brought back into focus the grim reality of war after months of easing tensions in the capital. (AP Photo/Roman Hrytsyna)
            
              Firefighters and police officers work on a site where an explosion created a crater on the street after a Russian attack in Dnipro, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. The Russian missiles that rained down Monday on cities across Ukraine, bringing fear and destruction to areas that had seen months of relative calm, are an escalation in Moscow's war against its neighbor. But military analysts say it’s far from clear whether the strikes mark a turning point in a war that has killed thousands of Ukrainians and sent millions fleeing from their homes. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
            
              A medical worker runs past a burning car after a Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. The Russian missiles that rained down Monday on cities across Ukraine, bringing fear and destruction to areas that had seen months of relative calm, are an escalation in Moscow's war against its neighbor. But military analysts say it’s far from clear whether the strikes mark a turning point in a war that has killed thousands of Ukrainians and sent millions fleeing from their homes. (AP Photo/Roman Hrytsyna)
            
              Firefighters and police officers work on a site where an explosion created a crater on the street after a Russian attack in Dnipro, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
            
              People work to clean the debris from damaged house after an overnight Russian shelling in Sloviansk, Donetsk region, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. Russia unleashed a lethal barrage of strikes against multiple Ukrainian cities Monday, smashing civilian targets including downtown Kyiv where at least eight people were killed. (AP Photo/Andriy Andriyenko)
            
              An injured man receives medical treatment at the scene of Russian shelling, in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. Multiple explosions rocked Kyiv early Monday following months of relative calm in the Ukrainian capital. Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko reported explosions in the city's Shevchenko district, a large area in the center of Kyiv that includes the historic old town as well as several government offices. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
            
              Police inspect the scene of Russian shelling in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. Multiple explosions rocked Kyiv early Monday following months of relative calm in the Ukrainian capital. Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko reported explosions in the city's Shevchenko district, a large area in the center of Kyiv that includes the historic old town as well as several government offices. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
            
              People receive medical treatment at the scene of Russian shelling, in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. Multiple explosions rocked Kyiv early Monday following months of relative calm in the Ukrainian capital. Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko reported explosions in the city's Shevchenko district, a large area in the center of Kyiv that includes the historic old town as well as several government offices. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

LONDON (AP) — The Russian missiles that rained down Monday on cities across Ukraine, bringing fear and destruction to areas that had seen months of relative calm, are an escalation in Moscow’s war against its neighbor.

But military analysts say it’s far from clear whether the strikes mark a turning point in a war that has killed thousands of Ukrainians and sent millions fleeing from their homes.

Russian President Vladimir Putin said the attacks were retaliation for a blast Saturday that damaged a showpiece bridge linking Russia to Crimea, the Ukrainian peninsula seized by Moscow in 2014. Putin called the Kerch Bridge attack an “act of terrorism” and vowed a “tough” response to any further attacks that threaten Russia’s security.

Simon Smith, a former British ambassador to Ukraine, said the Russian leader was trying to send “a ‘You ain’t seen nothing yet’ message” to Ukraine.

Smith said the hail of Russian missiles onto civilian areas was “psychological and physical intimidation” – but also “an act of desperation” from a Russian leader whose troops are losing territory in parts of eastern Ukraine that Moscow has already annexed.

“This is very much Putin on the back foot,” said Smith, who heads the Ukraine Forum at the think-tank Chatham House. “He is on the defensive.”

Russia’s defense ministry said it had targeted “military command and communication facilities and energy infrastructure,” but Ukraine accused Moscow of indiscriminately hitting civilian areas. Ukrainian authorities said Russia fired 84 missiles against 10 cities, with 56 of them neutralized by air defenses. At least a dozen people were killed and over 60 wounded in the missile strikes, officials said.

“Russia is seeking to overwhelm Ukrainian air defenses,” Justin Crump, chief executive of security consultancy Sibylline, told the BBC. “That’s something they have tried throughout the conflict, but never on this scale.”

Crump said Ukraine will likely seek more surface-to-air missiles from Western allies to strengthen its air defenses. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is due to speak Tuesday to Group of Seven leaders during a video conference.

Michael Clarke, a visiting professor in war studies at King’s College London, said Monday’s attacks, while brutal, likely were not a turning point in the war, “because in a way, the Russians are already doing their worst.”

Ukrainians are finding mass graves and evidence of torture — and are undertaking war crimes investigations — in cities and towns recaptured after months of Russian occupation.

“In increasing the worst, all they do is bring more civilian misery to Ukraine, which will harden the resolve (of Ukrainians),” Clarke said. “And they are still losing on the ground.”

Monday’s fierce bombardment came two days after Putin put air force chief Gen. Sergei Surovikin in command of all Russian forces in Ukraine. Surovikin previously led Russian forces in Syria and was accused of overseeing a brutal bombardment that destroyed much of the city of Aleppo.

Sidharth Kaushal, a research fellow at military think-tank the Royal United Services Institute, said Surovikin’s appointment probably will not bring a major change to Russia’s military campaign.

“He has had a career that’s been blighted by accusations of both corruption and brutality,” Kaushal said. “So that may be some insight into how he will approach it. But then again, the Russian approach has already been quite brutal.”

Kaushal said Russia had “used a pretty phenomenal number of missiles” in the war so far and could run short of some of modern precision weapons. But he said Russia had “large numbers of stockpiled holdovers from the Soviet era” and still retained a capacity to inflict heavy damage on Ukraine.

“Given the sheer number of targets, and given that overall, the Russian missiles in terms of their accuracy and performance have been reasonably good, you would expect at least some bits of Ukrainian critical infrastructure, some things like power grids, to be destroyed over the course of the campaign,” Kaushal said.

Andriy Yermak, a senior adviser to Zelenskyy, said Russia was seeking “to psychologically break Ukrainians, to make us wish the war ended no matter how.”

But Ukraine said it would not back down.

Kyiv has not officially claimed responsibility for the Crimea bridge attack, but Ukraine’s ambassador to Britain, Vadym Prystaiko, on Monday called the bridge a legitimate military target and said Kyiv’s forces would strike more sites of high military significance to Russia.

“We are not targeting Russian civilian infrastructure anywhere, especially beyond the Ukrainian official borders with Russia,” he told Times Radio. “But to achieve the victory, we will have to push further and further.”

Smith, the former ambassador, said Monday’s attacks were not “game-changing.” But he said Putin, faced with Ukrainian advances on the ground, had opened up “a new dimension” in the war.

“If Putin knows that deploying hundreds of thousands of his armed forces in Ukraine is going to be a dead loss because they are so poorly commanded and poorly equipped, then he is going to be looking for ways of visiting death and destruction on Ukraine from a greater distance,” Smith said — and that raises significant questions for Ukraine’s Western allies.

“The countries supporting Ukraine need to think about the ways they can help Ukraine defend itself against that,” Smith said.

___

London correspondent Jill Lawless has covered politics and international affairs for the Associated Press since 2000. ___

Follow the AP’s coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Analysts: Russian missiles seek to levy pain, could backfire