Report: Global crises can speed up move to clean energy

Oct 26, 2022, 9:19 AM | Updated: Oct 27, 2022, 2:18 am
FILE - Wind turbines turn on top of a dump next to the 'BP Refinery Scholven' in Gelsenkirchen, Ger...

FILE - Wind turbines turn on top of a dump next to the 'BP Refinery Scholven' in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Oct. 22, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

(AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

              FILE - Wind turbines turn on top of a dump next to the 'BP Refinery Scholven' in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Oct. 22, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)
            
              FILE - Wind turbines turn on top of a dump next to the 'BP Refinery Scholven' in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Oct. 22, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)
            
              FILE - A solar power plant in Pavagada Tumkur district, in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, India, Sept. 15, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File)
            
              FILE - Guests tour the five turbines of America's first offshore wind farm, owned by the Danish company, Orsted, off the coast of Block Island, R.I., as part of a wind power conference, Oct. 17, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
            
              FILE - Engineers chat under a wind turbine at Lekela wind power station, near the Red Sea city of Ras Ghareb some 300 km (186 miles), from Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades.  (AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)
            
              FILE - A woman works at a coal depot in Ahmedabad, India, May 2, 2022. Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday, Oct. 27. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki, File)

BENGALURU, India (AP) — Spiraling energy costs caused by various economic factors and the Ukraine war could be a turning point toward cleaner energy, the International Energy Agency said in a report Thursday. It found the global demand for fossil fuels, including coal, oil, and natural gas, is set to peak or plateau in the next few decades.

The report looked at scenarios based on current policies and said that coal use will fall back within the next few years, natural gas demand will reach a plateau by the end of the decade and rising sales of electric vehicles mean that the need for oil will level off in the mid-2030s before ebbing slightly by mid-century. Total emissions are currently going up each year, but slowly.

“Energy markets and policies have changed as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, not just for the time being, but for decades to come,” said the IEA’s executive director Fatih Birol. A surge in demand following COVID-19 pandemic restrictions lifting and bottlenecks in supply chains have also contributed to soaring energy prices.

“The energy world is shifting dramatically before our eyes. Government responses around the world promise to make this a historic and definitive turning point toward a cleaner, more affordable and more secure energy system,” Birol said.

The role of natural gas as a “transition fuel” that will bridge the gap between a fossil-fuel based energy system to a renewable one has also taken a dent, the report said. Although it’s a fossil fuel, natural gas is considered cleaner than coal and oil, as burning it produces less carbon dioxide.

But despite the largely positive outlook, the report adds that the share of fossil fuels in the global energy mix puts the world on track to a warming of 2.5 degrees Celsius (4.5 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century, a whole degree (1.8 Fahrenheit) more than the target set in the Paris climate deal.

That’s in line with a U.N. report released Wednesday that said current climate pledges are “nowhere near” where they need to be to meet the ambitious target. Top climate scientists say that to keep warming in line with the 1.5 C goal, emissions need to be slashed by 45% by 2030.

Energy policy analysts say that while there are promising steps in the right direction, the move toward clean energy needs to be much faster.

“Clean energy investment is delivering. It is the reason why the world is on track to peak CO2 emissions. But that’s only the first step. We need big emissions cuts, not a plateau,” said Dave Jones, an energy analyst at London-based environmental think-tank, Ember.

The report estimated that clean energy investment will be above $2 trillion by 2030 but added it would need to double to keep the transition in line with climate goals.

“The energy crisis has detracted from the climate crisis, but fortunately the answer is the same to both: a gigantic step up in clean energy investment,” Jones said.

“This report makes a very strong economic case for renewable energy which is not only more cost-competitive and affordable than fossil fuel alternatives but also is proving to be much more resilient to economic and geopolitical shocks,” said Maria Pastukhova a senior policy advisor at E3G, a climate change think-tank.

She added that leaders and negotiators at the U.N. climate conference in Egypt next month will need to “double down” on reducing the demand for energy and unlock finance for developing countries to help fund their transition to renewables which would speed up emissions cuts.

___

Follow AP’s climate and environment coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/climate-and-environment

___

Follow Sibi Arasu on Twitter at @sibi123

___

Associated Press climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. See more about AP’s climate initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

Shoppers looking for bargains enter an OshKosh children clothing store, Monday, Nov. 21, 2022, in M...
Anne D'Innocenzio and Cora Lewis, Associated Press

Shoppers hunt for deals but inflation makes bargains elusive

Consumers holding out for big deals -- and some much-needed relief from soaring costs on just about everything -- may be disappointed as they head into the busiest shopping season of the year.
17 hours ago
FILE - The Twitter splash page is seen on a digital device, Monday, April 25, 2022, in San Diego.  ...
Associated Press

Musk plans to relaunch Twitter premium service, again

Elon Musk said Friday that Twitter plans to relaunch its premium service that will offer different colored check marks to accounts next week.
17 hours ago
FILE - A school of fish swim above corals on Moore Reef in Gunggandji Sea Country off the coast of ...
Associated Press

Australia argues against ‘endangered’ Barrier Reef status

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s environment minister said Tuesday her government will lobby against UNESCO adding the Great Barrier Reef to a list of endangered World Heritage sites. Officials from the U.N. cultural agency and the International Union for Conservation of Nature released a report on Monday warning that without “ambitious, rapid and sustained” climate […]
17 hours ago
FILE - Dylan Brandt speaks at a news conference outside the federal courthouse in Little Rock, Ark....
Associated Press

Landmark trial over Arkansas youth gender care ban resumes

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A psychiatrist called to the stand by Arkansas as the state defends its ban on gender-affirming care for children said Monday he was concerned about the impact the law could have on some transgender youth who would see their treatments cut off. Dr. Stephen Levine, a psychiatrist at Case Western […]
17 hours ago
FILE - Oregon Sen. Brian Boquist poses in his office in the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore., We...
Associated Press

Oregon lawmakers lift security measure imposed on senator

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — On Monday an Oregon Senate panel rescinded the protective measure it had imposed on a state senator after he made threatening statements during an acrimonious 2019 legislative session, in a case that centers on free speech. Since July 2019, Sen. Brian Boquist had been required to give 12 hours notice before […]
17 hours ago
FILE - Mourners visit a makeshift memorial on Aug. 12, 2019, near the Walmart in El Paso, Texas, wh...
Associated Press

Embattled Texas prosecutor over 2019 Walmart attack resigns

EL PASO, Texas (AP) — A Texas prosecutor facing mounting criticism over the handling of the 2019 Walmart mass shooting in El Paso that killed 23 people resigned Monday after the county took the extraordinary step of seeking to remove her from elected office. El Paso County District Attorney Yvonne Rosales, a Democrat who was […]
17 hours ago

Sponsored Articles

SHIBA WA...

Medicare open enrollment is here and SHIBA can help!

The SHIBA program – part of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner – is ready to help with your Medicare open enrollment decisions.
Lake Washington Windows...

Choosing Best Windows for Your Home

Lake Washington Windows and Doors is a local window dealer offering the exclusive Leak Armor installation.
Anacortes Christmas Tree...

Come one, come all! Food, Drink, and Coastal Christmas – Anacortes has it all!

Come celebrate Anacortes’ 11th annual Bier on the Pier! Bier on the Pier takes place on October 7th and 8th and features local ciders, food trucks and live music - not to mention the beautiful views of the Guemes Channel and backdrop of downtown Anacortes.
Swedish Cyberknife Treatment...

The revolutionary treatment of Swedish CyberKnife provides better quality of life for majority of patients

There are a wide variety of treatments options available for men with prostate cancer. One of the most technologically advanced treatment options in the Pacific Northwest is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy using the CyberKnife platform at Swedish Medical Center.
Work at Zum Services...

Seattle Public Schools announces three-year contract with Zum

Seattle Public Schools just announced a three-year contract with a brand-new company to the Pacific Northwest to assist with their student transportation: Zum.
Swedish Cyberknife 900x506...

June is Men’s Health Month: Here’s Why It’s Important To Speak About Your Health

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, men in the United States, on average, die five years earlier than women.
Report: Global crises can speed up move to clean energy