Denmark PM to try to form new government after election win

Oct 31, 2022, 12:31 PM | Updated: Nov 1, 2022, 8:57 pm
Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen speaks during the country's general election ...

Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen speaks during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

(Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen speaks during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen gestures during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen gestures during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen reacts before given a speech during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Nikolai Linares/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen speaks during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen talks with media members after the country's general election night at the party in Copenhagen, Denmark, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen talks with media members after the country's general election night at the party in Copenhagen, Denmark, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party, speaks to members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark’s election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party, speaks to members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark’s election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen speaks during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party during a meeting with members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark's election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party, reacts during a meeting with members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, Denmark, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark's election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen speaks during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen talks with media members after the country's general election night at the party in Copenhagen, Denmark, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Denmark's Prime Minister and head of the Social Democratic Party Mette Frederiksen talks with media members after the country's general election night at the party in Copenhagen, Denmark, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Members of the Social Democratic Party and supporters of Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen celebrate their victory in the parliament in Copenhagen, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party, speaks to members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark’s election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party, speaks to members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark’s election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen speaks during the country's general election night at the party's office in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. (Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party during a meeting with members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark's election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Mette Frederiksen, Danish Prime Minister and chairman of the Social Democratic Party, reacts during a meeting with members of her party in the parliament in Copenhagen, Denmark, early Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes in Denmark's election Tuesday and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Votes are being counted at Aarhus Town Hall, Denmark, on Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Votes are being counted at Aarhus Town Hall, Denmark, on Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Votes are being counted at Aarhus Town Hall, Denmark, on Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Votes are being counted at Aarhus Town Hall, Denmark, on Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Votes are being counted at Aarhus Town Hall, Denmark, on Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Morten Messerschmidt from the Danish People's Party votes at Ordrup Library in Ordrup, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A man walks with a ballot before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A view of a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People receive ballots for casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, right, kisses with her husband Bo Tengberg after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A dog waits as people fill ballots before casting at a polling station at City Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Conservative People's Party Soeren Pape Poulsen votes at the Viborg Stadionhal in Viborg, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Copenhagen, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg casts her ballot, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of Denmark's Liberal Party Jakob Ellemann-Jensen votes at Rude Skov School in Birkeroed, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Bo Amstrup /Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen speaks to media after casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen speak to the media before voting, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Moderates Party Lars Lokke Rasmussen and his wife Solrun Jakupsdottir Lokke Rasmussen cast their ballots, at Nyboder School in Copenhagen, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022. Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Martin Sylvest/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Head of the Denmark Democrats Inger Stojberg speaks to the media prior to voting, in Hadsund, Jutland, Denmark, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022.  Polling stations have opened across Denmark in elections expected to change the Scandinavian nation’s political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              People queue up to cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              People cast their ballots for the general election at a polling station in Odense Town Hall, Denmark, Tuesday Nov. 1, 2022. Denmark's election is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. (Henning Bagger/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen smiles before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A man leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman leaves a voting booth before casting at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              People wait in a line to cast their ballots at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              A woman with a child receives a ballot at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
            
              Election Commission official rings a bell to mark voting open at a polling station in Hareskovhallen in Vaerloese, Denmark, on Tuesday, Nov 1, 2022. Denmark's election on Tuesday is expected to change its political landscape, with new parties hoping to enter parliament and others seeing their support dwindle. A former prime minister who left his party to create a new one this year could end up as a kingmaker, with his votes being needed to form a new government. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen was in a strong position to remain in power after her Social Democrats won the most votes Tuesday in Denmark’s election and a center-left bloc in Parliament that backs her appeared set to retain a majority by just one seat.

The result was preliminary and based on the assumption that a vote count in Greenland expected early Wednesday would give the autonomous Danish territory’s two seats to the center-left bloc.

“I am so thrilled and proud. We have gotten the best election result in 20 years,” Frederiksen told supporters early Wednesday in Copenhagen.

Despite the success, Frederiksen, who heads a Social Democratic minority government, said she would resign as prime minister and try to form a new government with broader support across the political divide, something she had said suggested before the election.

“It is also clear there is no longer a majority behind the government in its current form. Therefore, tomorrow I will submit the government’s resignation to the queen,” said Frederiksen, adding that she would meet with other parties about forming a new government.

Frederiksen was forced to call the vote earlier this month amid the fallout from her government’s contentious decision to cull millions of minks as a pandemic response measure. The cull and chilling images of mass graves of minks have haunted Frederiksen since 2020 and eventually led to cracks in the center-left bloc.

The Social Democrats remained Denmark’s top party with 28% of the vote, but it remained unclear long into the night whether the center-left parties together would reach the 90 seats needed for a majority in the 179-seat Parliament. Exit polls suggested they would fall short, but the decisive seat flipped at the very end of the vote count.

Before that former Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen appeared set to become kingmaker. His newly formed centrist party won 9% of the vote for 16 seats, according to the preliminary results.

Løkke Rasmussen said he too wanted to Mette Frederiksen to try to form a government but he would not point at her “as prime minister.”

A two-time government leader who lost the 2019 election to Frederiksen and abandoned the center-right Liberal party following an internal power struggle, Løkke Rasmussen, wouldn’t say whom he would back as the next prime minister or whether he saw that role for himself.

“I know for sure that Denmark needs a new government, ” he told jubilant supporters in Copenhagen. “Who is going to sit at the end of the table we do not know.”

Denmark may be a small, tranquil country known for having some of the happiest people on Earth, but its politics is filled with intrigue that will be familiar to fans of the fictional Danish TV drama series “Borgen.”

Before the election, Frederiksen, 44, floated the idea of a broader alliance that would also include opposition parties, but was rebuffed by opposition leaders Jakob Ellemann-Jensen of the Liberals and Søren Pape Poulsen of the Conservatives, who both ran as candidates for prime minister in a center-right government.

Even though the election result suggested she could ostensibly carry on as prime minster with only center-left support, Frederiksen said she would keep her ambition to also reach out to opposition parties.

“The Social Democrats went to the election to form a broad government,” she said. “I will investigate whether it can be done.”

Denmark’s more than 4 million voters could choose among over 1,000 candidates — the most ever — from 14 parties. Four of the 179 seats in the Danish legislature, Folketinget, are reserved for the Faeroe Islands and Greenland, which are autonomous Danish territories.

Concerns about rising inflation and energy prices linked to Russia’s war in Ukraine and a shortage of nurses in the public health care system were key themes in election campaigns.

“What I feel is important and is a worry to many are the soaring prices, whether it be electricity, bread or gasoline,” said Inge Bjerre Hansen, 82, after casting her vote in Copenhagen. “My son is reducing the number of his visits because it has become expensive to fill the tank (of his car).”

Unlike in previous elections, immigration received little attention. Denmark has some of Europe’s strictest immigration laws and there is broad agreement among the major parties to keep it that way.

That and internal squabbles help explain the collapse of the populist Danish People’s Party, which spearheaded Denmark’s crackdown on immigration two decades ago. Once polling over 20%, the party recorded its worst parliamentary election result since its creation in 1995, with around 3% of the vote, the results showed.

The Danish People’s Party faced competition for nationalist voters from new right-wing parties. Among them are the Denmark Democrats, created in June by former hardline immigration minister Inger Støjberg. In 2021, Støjberg was convicted by the rarely used Impeachment Court for a 2016 order to separate asylum-seeking couples if one of the partners was a minor.

She was eligible to run for office again after serving her 60-day sentence. The official results showed her party getting 8%.

Frederiksen, who became Denmark’s youngest prime minister when she took office at 41 more than three years ago, teamed up with the opposition to hike NATO-member Denmark’s defense spending in the wake of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Her steadfast leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic was partly overshadowed by the mink-culling episode.

The decision to slaughter up to 17 million minks to protect humans from a mutation of the coronavirus was taken in haste and without the required legislation in place. It dealt a devastating blow to Danish mink farmers, even though there was no evidence the mutated virus found among some minks was more dangerous than other strains.

___

Ritter reported from Stockholm. Associated Press journalists and Aleksandar Furtula and Anders Kongshaug in Copenhagen contributed to this report.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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