Drought tests resilience of Spain’s olive groves and farmers

Nov 6, 2022, 9:24 AM | Updated: 11:51 pm
A day laborer works at the olive harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the ...

A day laborer works at the olive harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

(AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

              Friends and relatives of the Palop family have dinner after the olive harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2022. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              A bucket full of olives in brine rest inside the Palop farmhouse in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops.  (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Mari Angeles Parra picks olives during a weekend family and friends gathering in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2022 Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Basilio Palop, left, and a friend pick olives from a small family plantation in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops.  (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              The sun's rays pass through olive tree branches in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops.  (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Spain's Agriculture Minister Luis Planas Puchades, left, walks inside the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Madrid, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. “Our forecast for this harvest season is notoriously low,” he said. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Tanks are used to store olive oil at the "La Betica Aceitera" oil mill in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              A tank is filled with olive oil at the "La Betica Aceitera" oil mill in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              A worker supervises the olive oil bottling at the "La Betica Aceitera" olive mill in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              The poem "olive pickers" by the late Spanish poet Miguel Hernández is exhibited at Zabaleta - Miguel Hernández Museum in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Rows of olive trees grow in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo)
            
              Olives are stored at a mill prior to being processed in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              A pond is filled with water from the Arteson river and used by local olive farmers in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Farmer Juan Antonio Delgado, 57, poses for a portrait at his olive tree plantation in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. Delgado said that he is only collecting half the olives he did by this time last year. That is right in line with the national average.  (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Day laborers work at the olive harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops.  (AP Photo)
            
              Branches of an olive tree are shaken during the harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              Day laborers work at the olive harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)
            
              A day laborer works at the olive harvest in the southern town of Quesada, a rural community in the heartland of Spain's olive country, Friday, Oct. 28, 2022. Spain, the world’s leading olive producer, has seen its harvest this year fall victim to the global weather shifts fueled by climate change. An extremely hot and dry summer that has shrunk reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of its staple crops. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

QUESADA, Spain (AP) — An extremely hot, dry summer that shrank reservoirs and sparked forest fires is now threatening the heartiest of Spain’s staple crops: the olives that make the European country the world’s leading producer and exporter of the tiny green fruits that are pressed into golden oil.

Industry experts and authorities predict Spain’s fall olive harvest will be nearly half the size of last year’s, another casualty of global weather shifts caused by climate change.

“I am 57 years old and I have never seen a year like this one,” farmer Juan Antonio Delgado said as he walked past his rows of olive trees in the southeast town of Quesada. “My intention is to hang on as long as I can, but when the costs rise above what I make from production we will all be out of a job.”

High temperatures in May killed many of the blossoms on the olive trees in Spanish orchards. The ones that survived produced fruits that were small and thin because of not enough water. A little less moisture can actually yield better olive oil, but the recent drought is proving too much for them.

This year has been the third-driest in Spain since records were started in 1964. The Mediterranean country also had its hottest summer on record.

Spain’s 350,000 olive farmers typically harvest their crops in early October, ahead of their full ripeness, in order to produce the olive oil. But with his olives still too puny to pick, Delgado left most of the fruit on his trees, hoping for rain. So far, no luck.

If the wished-for rain doesn’t arrive soon, the country will produce nearly half as many olives as it did last year, according to Spain’s agriculture minister.

“Our forecast for this harvest season is notoriously low,” Agriculture Minister Luis Planas told The Associated Press. “The ministry predicts that it won’t even reach 800,000 tonnes (882,000 U.S. tons),” compared with 1.47 million tonnes (1.62 million U.S. tons) in 2021.

Olive trees cover 2.7 million hectares (6.8 million acres) of Spain’s soil, with a full 37% of them found in Jaén province, which is known for its “sea of olives” and where Delgado farms.

On average, Spain grows more than three times as many olives as Italy and Greece, which also are seeing smaller yields.

Olive oil production in the European Union as a whole is forecast to fall drastically compared with last year, according to the Committee of Professional Agricultural Organizations and the General Confederation of Agricultural Cooperatives,

The European farming organizations, known by the acronyms COPA and COGECA, warned in September that the yield could drop by 35% due to drought and high temperatures. The two groups called the situation in Spain “particularly worrying.”

The smaller harvest is driving up prices, according to Italian olive oil producer Filippo Berio. The company said the price of European olives for extra virgin oil has soared from 500 euros per tonne ($495) to 4,985 euros ($4,938) per tonne.

Along with warmer than usual weather, the drought is affecting Spanish olives in other ways. Farming method consultant Antonio Bernal is witnessing the return of long-forgotten diseases during his visits to Quesada. He believes that milder winters are helping fungi to proliferate.

Bernal also fears that the most widespread variety of olive cultivated in Jaén won’t be able to adapt to such a quickly changing climate.

“The solution is to stop climate change: Olive groves cannot adapt at a pace to assume such a fast change,” Bernal said.

Besides the olive branch being the universal symbol of peace, the olive is a symbol of the Mediterranean. Plato was said to have dispensed his wisdom under an olive tree and the olive’s widespread cultivation in Spain goes back to the Romans.

When it got too dry for orange and lemon trees, olive trees were counted on to continue thriving. The short, gnarly trees cling to dry, rocky ground and seem not to mind when the sun comes pounding down. Under torrid midday conditions, microscopic pores on their leaves close to reduce water loss.

“For Jaén, the olive has been our culture, our way of subsisting and feeding our families,” said olive farmer Manuel García.

Yet even the hearty olive has limits. These days, the fruit represents the challenges communities face in a hotter, dryer world.

Researcher Virginia Hernández is an olive expert based at the Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology in Seville, Spain. She is studying how to adapt irrigation practices to drought, specifically the point at which “sub-optimum” quantities of water can be used to promote sustainability.

With less rain likely to become a norm, using water sparingly is critical, Hernández said. She thinks a more intelligent use of high-tech irrigation systems combined with more drought-resistant varieties of trees could save the industry as the planet warms.

According to climate experts, the Mediterranean is expected to be one of the fastest warming regions of the world in the coming years. The trick is convincing farmers that reducing their output some today might save their livelihoods tomorrow, the kind of adaptability at which olives are particularly adept, Hernández said.

“The truth is that the olive is the paradigmatic species when it comes to resisting a lack of water,” she said. “I can’t think of another that can hold up like the olive. … It knows how to suffer.”

___

Joseph Wilson reported from Barcelona, Spain. Photojournalist Bernat Armangue and videojournalist Iain Sullivan contributed from Quesada.

___

Follow AP’s coverage of the climate and environment: https://apnews.com/hub/climate-and-environment

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

Shoppers looking for bargains enter an OshKosh children clothing store, Monday, Nov. 21, 2022, in M...
Anne D'Innocenzio and Cora Lewis, Associated Press

Shoppers hunt for deals but inflation makes bargains elusive

Consumers holding out for big deals -- and some much-needed relief from soaring costs on just about everything -- may be disappointed as they head into the busiest shopping season of the year.
8 hours ago
FILE - The Twitter splash page is seen on a digital device, Monday, April 25, 2022, in San Diego.  ...
Associated Press

Musk plans to relaunch Twitter premium service, again

Elon Musk said Friday that Twitter plans to relaunch its premium service that will offer different colored check marks to accounts next week, in a fresh move to revamp the service after a previous attempt backfired. It’s the latest change to the social media platform that the billionaire Tesla CEO bought last month for $44 […]
8 hours ago
Attorneys of Oath Keepers leader Stewart Rhodes, James Lee Bright, left, and Phillip Linder, arrive...
Associated Press

Jury deliberations resume in Oath Keepers 1/6 sedition case

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jurors who will decide whether to convict Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes and four associates of seditious conspiracy resumed deliberations Monday in the high-stakes trial stemming from the U.S. Capitol attack. Rhodes and his co-defendants are accused of a weekslong plot to stop the transfer of power from Republican Donald Trump to […]
1 day ago
A dog who got trapped in his owners' car for some 72 hours peeks through the windscreen while rescu...
Associated Press

Spotlight on illegal buildings as Ischia death toll now at 8

MILAN (AP) — The Italian resort island of Ischia has a long history of natural disasters, but experts say this weekend’s landslide that has killed eight people and left five missing was exacerbated by a combination of climate change and often-illegal excessive development. Search teams digging through meters of mud and debris for a third […]
1 day ago
Forensic assistant Laurentiu Bigu, left, and investigator Ryan Parraz from the Los Angeles County c...
Associated Press

Fentanyl’s scourge plainly visible on streets of Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In an filthy alley behind a Los Angeles donut shop, Ryan Smith convulsed in the grips of a fentanyl high — lurching from moments of slumber to bouts of violent shivering on a warm summer day. When Brandice Josey, another homeless addict, bent down and blew a puff of fentanyl smoke […]
1 day ago
Associated Press

UN: Great Barrier Reef should be on heritage ‘danger’ list

PARIS (AP) — A United Nations-backed mission is recommending that the Great Barrier Reef be added to the list of endangered World Heritage sites, sounding the alarm that without “ambitious, rapid and sustained” climate action the world’s largest coral reef is in peril. The warning came in a report published Monday following a 10-day mission […]
1 day ago

Sponsored Articles

SHIBA WA...

Medicare open enrollment is here and SHIBA can help!

The SHIBA program – part of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner – is ready to help with your Medicare open enrollment decisions.
Lake Washington Windows...

Choosing Best Windows for Your Home

Lake Washington Windows and Doors is a local window dealer offering the exclusive Leak Armor installation.
Anacortes Christmas Tree...

Come one, come all! Food, Drink, and Coastal Christmas – Anacortes has it all!

Come celebrate Anacortes’ 11th annual Bier on the Pier! Bier on the Pier takes place on October 7th and 8th and features local ciders, food trucks and live music - not to mention the beautiful views of the Guemes Channel and backdrop of downtown Anacortes.
Swedish Cyberknife Treatment...

The revolutionary treatment of Swedish CyberKnife provides better quality of life for majority of patients

There are a wide variety of treatments options available for men with prostate cancer. One of the most technologically advanced treatment options in the Pacific Northwest is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy using the CyberKnife platform at Swedish Medical Center.
Work at Zum Services...

Seattle Public Schools announces three-year contract with Zum

Seattle Public Schools just announced a three-year contract with a brand-new company to the Pacific Northwest to assist with their student transportation: Zum.
Swedish Cyberknife 900x506...

June is Men’s Health Month: Here’s Why It’s Important To Speak About Your Health

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, men in the United States, on average, die five years earlier than women.
Drought tests resilience of Spain’s olive groves and farmers