AP

NASA’s moon rocket on track for Wednesday launch attempt

Nov 13, 2022, 6:43 PM | Updated: Nov 15, 2022, 12:32 pm


              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)
            
              A close-up view of NASA’s moon rocket at Kennedy Space Center, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Hurricane Nicole's high winds last week caused a 10-foot section of caulking  to peel away near the capsule at the top of the rocket. Mission managers want to make sure the narrow strip won't damage the rocket if it breaks off during liftoff, scheduled for Nov. 16, at 1:04 a.m. EST with test dummies on board. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
            
              NASA's new moon rocket sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

Visitors at Kennedy Space Center view NASA's new moon rocket as she sits on Launch Pad 39-B Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA's 21st-century moon-exploration program, named Artemis after Apollo's mythological twin sister. NASA is targeting an early Wednesday morning launch attempt. (AP Photo/Terry Renna)

(AP Photo/Terry Renna)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA remained on track for Wednesday’s planned liftoff of its new moon rocket, after determining that hurricane damage provided little extra risk to the test flight.

Hurricane Nicole’s high winds caused a 10-foot (3-meter) section of caulking to peel away near the crew capsule at the top of the rocket last Thursday. The material tore away in small pieces, rather than one big strip, said mission manager Mike Sarafin.

“We’re comfortable flying as is,” based on flight experience with this material, Sarafin told reporters Monday night.

Liftoff is scheduled for the early morning hours of Wednesday from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, with test dummies rather than astronauts on board. It’s the first test flight for the 322-foot (98-meter) rocket, the most powerful ever built by NASA, and will attempt to send the capsule into lunar orbit.

The nearly monthlong $4 billion mission has been grounded since August by fuel leaks and Hurricane Ian, which forced the rocket back into its hangar for shelter at the end of September. The rocket remained at the pad for Nicole; managers said there wasn’t enough time to move it once it became clear the storm was going to be stronger than anticipated.

Sarafin acknowledged Monday night that there’s “a small likelihood” that more of the pliable, lightweight caulking might come off during liftoff. The most likely place to be hit would be a particularly large and robust section of the rocket, he noted, resulting in minimal damage.

Engineers never determined what caused the dangerous hydrogen fuel leaks during the two late summer launch attempts. But the launch team is confident that slowing the flow rate will put less pressure on the sensitive fuel line seals and keep any leakage within acceptable limits, said Jeremy Parsons, a deputy program manager.

The space agency plans to send astronauts around the moon in 2024 and land a crew on the lunar surface in 2025.

Astronauts last visited the moon in December 1972, closing out the Apollo program.

A microwave oven-size NASA satellite, meanwhile, arrived Sunday in a special lunar orbit following a summer liftoff from New Zealand. This elongated orbit, stretching as much as tens of thousands of miles (kilometers), is where the space agency plans to build a depot for lunar crews. The way station, known as Gateway, will serve astronauts going to and from the lunar surface.

The satellite, called Capstone, will spend six months testing a navigation system in this orbit.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

Water spills over the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, which runs along the Washington and Ore...

Associated Press

Biden deal with tribes promises $200M for Columbia River salmon reintroduction

The Biden administration has pledged over $200 million toward reintroducing salmon in the Upper Columbia River Basin in an agreement with tribes that includes a stay on litigation for 20 years.

4 hours ago

FILE - Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., arrives for a vote on Capitol Hill, Sept. 6, 2023 in Washington. ...

Associated Press

Sen. Menendez, wife indicted on bribe charges as probe finds $100,000 in gold bars, prosecutors say

U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey and his wife have been indicted on charges of bribery.

7 hours ago

A man holds an iPhone next to an Amazon Echo, center, and a Google Home, right, in New York on June...

Associated Press

Amazon unveils a ‘smarter and more conversational’ Alexa amid AI race among tech companies

Amazon has unveiled a slew of gadgets and an update to its popular voice assistant Alexa, infusing it with more generative AI features to better compete with other tech companies who’ve rolled out flashy chatbots.

10 hours ago

murdoch...

David Bauder, The Associated Press

Rupert Murdoch, whose creation of Fox News made him a force in American politics, is stepping down

Murdoch inherited a newspaper in Adelaide, Australia, from his father in 1952 and eventually built a news and entertainment enterprise.

1 day ago

FILE - United Auto Workers members walk a picket line during a strike at the Ford Motor Company Mic...

Associated Press

United Auto Workers threaten to expand targeted strike if there is no substantive progress by Friday

The United Auto Workers union is stepping up pressure on Detroit’s Big Three by threatening to expand its strike unless it sees major progress in contract negotiations by Friday.

2 days ago

FILE - The Amazon Prime logo appears on the side of a delivery van as it departs an Amazon Warehous...

Associated Press

Amazon plans to hire 250,000 workers for holiday season

Amazon said on Tuesday that it will hire 250,000 full- and part-time workers for the holiday season, a 67% jump compared to last year.

3 days ago

Sponsored Articles

Swedish Cyberknife...

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

September is a busy month on the sports calendar and also holds a very special designation: Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.

Ziply Fiber...

Dan Miller

The truth about Gigs, Gs and other internet marketing jargon

If you’re confused by internet technologies and marketing jargon, you’re not alone. Here's how you can make an informed decision.

Education families...

Education that meets the needs of students, families

Washington Virtual Academies (WAVA) is a program of Omak School District that is a full-time online public school for students in grades K-12.

Emergency preparedness...

Emergency planning for the worst-case scenario

What would you do if you woke up in the middle of the night and heard an intruder in your kitchen? West Coast Armory North can help.

Innovative Education...

The Power of an Innovative Education

Parents and students in Washington state have the power to reimagine the K-12 educational experience through Insight School of Washington.

Medicare fraud...

If you’re on Medicare, you can help stop fraud!

Fraud costs Medicare an estimated $60 billion each year and ultimately raises the cost of health care for everyone.

NASA’s moon rocket on track for Wednesday launch attempt