For many Hawaiians, lava flows are a time to honor, reflect

Dec 1, 2022, 8:02 AM | Updated: Dec 2, 2022, 12:59 pm
A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, ne...

A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

(AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

              A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch and record images of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, a Native Hawaiian from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, sings as she leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, a Native Hawaiian from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch and record images of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, a Native Hawaiian from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, sings as she leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, a Native Hawaiian from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, sings as she leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, a Native Hawaiian from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, looks on after leaving an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, a Native Hawaiian from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch and record images of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch and record images of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch and record images of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People use lights from their phones to find their way along a trail after viewing the Mauna Loa volcano, as cars sit in traffic along Saddle Road, right, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People use light from their phones to find their way along a trail after viewing the Mauna Loa volcano, as cars sit in traffic along Saddle Road, right, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Lava glows at the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People bathed in light from red flashlights look at a line of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Cars wait in traffic along Saddle Road, with occupants waiting to view the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Lava from the Mauna Loa volcano glows Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Lava flows at the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              A woman records with her phone as lava erupts from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              People watch and record images of lava from the Mauna Loa volcano Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              An offering sits among blackened lava rock from a previous eruption near the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              A Native Hawaiian offering is left on an old lava field in front of the erupting Mauna Loa, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
            
              A man looks on as lava erupts from Hawaii's Mauna Loa volcano Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Willette Kalaokahaku Akima-Akau, left, and her husband Eddie Akau stand at a spot overlooking lava flowing from Mauna Loa on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022 in Hilo, Hawaii. For Akima-Akau and other Native Hawaiians, the eruption brings deep and personal cultural significance. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
            
              Allen Mozo, of Haleiwa, Hawaii, carries an offering to an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Allen Mozo, of Haleiwa, Hawaii, left, takes a moment in front alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Allen Mozo, of Haleiwa, leaves an offering at an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Allen Mozo, of Haleiwa, Hawaii, takes a moment in front alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, sings as she leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, sings as she leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, leaves an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              Illona Ilae, of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, looks on after leaving an offering in front an alter below the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. Glowing lava from the world's largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa's eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              An offering sits among blackened lava rock from a previous eruption near the Mauna Loa volcano as it erupts Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
            
              An altar is built on an old lava field in front of the erupting Mauna Loa, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022, near Hilo, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

HONOLULU (AP) — When Willette Kalaokahaku Akima-Akau looks out at the the lava flowing from Mauna Loa volcano and makes an offering of gin, tobacco and coins, she will be taking part in a tradition passed down from her grandfather and other Native Hawaiians as a way to honor both the natural and spiritual worlds.

Akima-Akau said she plans to take her grandchildren with her and together they will make their offerings and chant to Pele, the Hawaiian deity of volcanoes and fire, who her grandfather used to pay reverence to as a kupuna, a word that can mean ancestor.

“This is the time for our kupuna, for our people, and for our children to come and witness what is happening as history is being made every day,” she said, adding that today’s experiences will be added to the next generation’s stories, songs, dances and chants.

For many Native Hawaiians, an eruption of a volcano like Mauna Loa has a deep yet very personal cultural significance. For many it can be an opportunity to feel a connection with creation itself through the way lava gives birth to new land, as well as a time to reflect on their own place in the world and the people who came before them.

“A volcanic eruption is a physical manifestation of so many natural and spiritual forces for Hawaiians,” said Ilihia Gionson, a Hawaii Tourism Authority spokesperson who is Native Hawaiian and lives on the Big Island. “People who are unfamiliar with that should understand that it’s a very personal, very significant thing.”

To be sure, not all Native Hawaiians will feel the need to make a trek to see the lava, but among those who do, some may chant, some may pray to ancestors and some may honor the moment with hula, or dance.

“Some people may be moved to just kind of observe in silence, meditate, you know, commune with their higher power or their kupuna in their own ways,” Gionson said.

Kainani Kahaunaele said as a Native Hawaiian, she feels moved to honor the moment and will take her children, nieces, nephews and close friends as close to the lava flow as possible. There they will chant to Pele.

“Our hookupu will be our voice,” she said, using the Hawaiian word for offering. “It’s not for any kind of show. It’s a connection that we’re making to Pele, to the land, to Mauna Loa.”

Many Hawaiians are practicing family traditions that have been passed down from elders.

Akima-Akau, who lives in Kawaihae on the west side of the Big Island, remembers hearing stories about how her grandfather would fly from Maui or Oahu whenever there was a Big Island lava flow to honor Pele.

“He would jump on a plane and come to Hawaii Island to give his hookupu,” offerings of gin, silver dollars and tobacco, she said.

Her grandfather died before she was born, so she doesn’t know exactly why he chose those items, but he wasn’t alone. She said she grew up knowing others who offered the same items, so that is what her family will bring. She said the children will offer Pele a ti leaf lei.

Hawaiians have different relationships with the spirituality of lava, said Native Hawaiian cultural practitioner Kealoha Pisciotta. To Pisciotta, the lava “brings good mana” — which can mean supernatural or divine power — “and cleanses where it needs cleansing.”

There are also different relationships and connections to Pele, who some refer to as a god or goddess. Pele has great significance in Hawaiian culture, representing all the phenomena related to volcanoes — the magma, steam, ash, acid rain.

“Her primary form is the lava, not necessarily that she is a female, human person. But the image of her function is creation, which happens to be a very feminine image,” said Kekuhi Keali?ikanaka?ole, a cultural practitioner in Hilo.

Pisciotta calls her “Tutu Pele,” using the word for grandparent, because deities “are more ancient than we are.”

Manua Loa’s spectacular show is drawing thousands of people seeking nighttime views of the lava flowing down the mountain’s northeast flank, clogging the main east-west road on the island. Among them are those coming to pay their respects, leaving altars or shrines along the roadway.

The slow-moving lava flow was about 2.7 miles (4.3 kilometers) from the road Friday, U.S. Geological Survey scientists said.

Cultural practitioners like Pisciotta want lava gawkers to be mindful of those who are chanting, praying or gathering in ceremonies amid the eruption: “Give them some space and respect.”

“If a person doing something wants to invite somebody to participate or watch, there will be an invitation,” said Gionson, the tourism official. “And if not, respect that and keep a respectful distance.”

So far, the tourism authority hasn’t received any complaints about people getting in the way of cultural practices, he said, adding that the agency focuses on educating tourists in general about being respectful and behaving appropriately when visiting the islands.

Kahaunaele, who teaches Hawaiian language and music at the University of Hawaii’s Hilo campus and planned to gather with her family on Thursday night, knows that visitors to the island might be curious when they see and hear her family chanting.

“Don’t film us. Don’t even ask for permission, just don’t,” she said. “That even goes for locals. Don’t infringe upon anybody else’s moment.”

___

Associated Press reporter Caleb Jones in Hilo, Hawaii, contributed to this report.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

FILE - Zoubin Ghahramani, vice president of research at Google, speaks at the Google AI@ event on W...
Associated Press

Google has the next move as Microsoft embraces OpenAI buzz

Before the artificial intelligence tool ChatGPT was unleashed into the world, the novelist Robin Sloan was testing a similar AI writing assistant built by researchers at Google.
14 hours ago
budgets...
Associated Press

Group’s lawsuit seeks to void Washington transportation law

A conservative legal advocacy organization is suing to halt the nearly $17 billion transportation funding bill passed by the Washington Legislature and signed by Gov. Jay Inslee last year.
14 hours ago
Associated Press

S. Carolina bill shielding death penalty drugmakers advances

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Republicans’ quest to resume executions in South Carolina overcame another hurdle Thursday. The state Senate Corrections and Penology Committee approved a bill that would shield the identities of the companies that dispense the drug cocktail used to execute people on death row. The full Senate must now take up the latest […]
2 days ago
Associated Press

US to send Ukraine longer-range bombs in latest turnaround

WASHINGTON (AP) — After months of agonizing, the U.S has agreed to send longer-range bombs to Ukraine as it prepares to launch a spring offensive to retake territory Russia captured last year, U.S. officials said Thursday, confirming that the new weapons will have roughly double the range of any other offensive weapon provided by America. […]
2 days ago
Associated Press

Dance hall 911 caller: ‘He might start shooting again’

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A gunman had fired his first deadly shots outside a dance hall when Monterey Park police got a call for help from a man trying to make sense of what happened to his partner sitting in the car next to him. “Is your girlfriend awake?” the dispatcher asked. “I’m not sure,” […]
2 days ago
Cricket Hall speaks against a bill that would ban gender-affirming surgery and hormone therapy for ...
Associated Press

Crowds decry gender-affirming treatment ban in West Virginia

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Crowds at the West Virginia state Capitol pleaded with lawmakers Thursday to show as much compassion for saving the lives of transgender children as they showed for unborn fetuses when they voted to ban abortion just months ago. Over and over, dozens of doctors, parents and LGBTQ people told the Republican […]
2 days ago

Sponsored Articles

safety from crime...

As crime increases, our safety measures must too

It's easy to be accused of fearmongering regarding crime, but Seattle residents might have good reason to be concerned for their safety.
Comcast Ready for Business Fund...
Ilona Lohrey | President and CEO, GSBA

GSBA is closing the disparity gap with Ready for Business Fund

GSBA, Comcast, and other partners are working to address disparities in access to financial resources with the Ready for Business fund.
SHIBA WA...

Medicare open enrollment is here and SHIBA can help!

The SHIBA program – part of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner – is ready to help with your Medicare open enrollment decisions.
Lake Washington Windows...

Choosing Best Windows for Your Home

Lake Washington Windows and Doors is a local window dealer offering the exclusive Leak Armor installation.
Anacortes Christmas Tree...

Come one, come all! Food, Drink, and Coastal Christmas – Anacortes has it all!

Come celebrate Anacortes’ 11th annual Bier on the Pier! Bier on the Pier takes place on October 7th and 8th and features local ciders, food trucks and live music - not to mention the beautiful views of the Guemes Channel and backdrop of downtown Anacortes.
Swedish Cyberknife Treatment...

The revolutionary treatment of Swedish CyberKnife provides better quality of life for majority of patients

There are a wide variety of treatments options available for men with prostate cancer. One of the most technologically advanced treatment options in the Pacific Northwest is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy using the CyberKnife platform at Swedish Medical Center.
For many Hawaiians, lava flows are a time to honor, reflect