‘It’s fate.’ 40 years later, Ke Huy Quan is a star, again

Dec 7, 2022, 9:15 PM | Updated: Dec 8, 2022, 1:23 pm
Ke Huy Quan, star of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," poses for a portrait on Sunday, Nov. 20, ...

Ke Huy Quan, star of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," poses for a portrait on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022, at The London Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Dana Pleasant/Invision/AP)

(Photo by Dana Pleasant/Invision/AP)

              FILE - Producer George Lucas, from left, actors Kate Capshaw and Ke Huy Quan appear with director Steven Spielberg in London where they are attending the "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," premiere in London on June 11, 1984. Ke Huy Quan stars in the 2022 film, "Everything Everywhere All at Once." (AP Photo/Joe Schaber, File)
            
              This image released by A24 Films shows Ke Huy Quan in a scene from "Everything Everywhere All at Once." (Allyson Riggs/A24 via AP)
            
              Ke Huy Quan attends the Gotham Independent Film Awards at Cipriani Wall Street on Monday, Nov. 28, 2022, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
            
              FILE - Ke Huy Quan appears at the Governors Awards on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022, at Fairmont Century Plaza in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
            
              This image released by A24 Films shows Ke Huy Quan, left, and Michelle Yeoh in a scene from "Everything Everywhere All at Once." (Allyson Riggs/A24 via AP)
            
              Ke Huy Quan, star of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," poses for a portrait on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022, at The London Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Dana Pleasant/Invision/AP)
            
              This image released by A24 Films shows, from left, Stephanie Hsu, Ke Huy Quan, Michelle Yeoh and James Hong in a scene from "Everything Everywhere All at Once." (Allyson Riggs/A24 via AP)
            
              Ke Huy Quan, star of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," poses for a portrait on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022, at The London Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Dana Pleasant/Invision/AP)
            
              This image released by A24 Films shows Ke Huy Quan in a scene from "Everything Everywhere All at Once." (Allyson Riggs/A24 via AP)
            
              Ke Huy Quan, star of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," poses for a portrait on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022, at The London Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Dana Pleasant/Invision/AP)
            
              This image released by A24 Films shows Ke Huy Quan in a scene from "Everything Everywhere All at Once." (Allyson Riggs/A24 via AP)
            
              Ke Huy Quan, star of "Everything Everywhere All at Once," poses for a portrait on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022, at The London Hotel in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Dana Pleasant/Invision/AP)
            
              Ke Huy Quan attends the Gotham Independent Film Awards at Cipriani Wall Street on Monday, Nov. 28, 2022, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — Ke Huy Quan is trying hard not to cry.

He’s been crying a lot lately. Quan tends to get emotional any time he contemplates his sudden reversal of fate. Every since “Everything Everywhere All at Once” opened in theaters earlier this year, 51-year-old Quan — who a lifetime ago was the iconic child star of “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom,” as Short Round, and Data in “Goonies” — has been, he says, “overwhelmed by emotions every day.”

“I didn’t think this day would come. It was a day I wanted for so long, for decades. And it’s finally here,” says Quan. “When you have a dream and you kind of bury it because you think it won’t come true, to see it finally come true is incredible.”

“I cry a lot,” he says.

Quan was once one of the most indelible faces — and voices — of the 1980s. He was 12 when he was cast as Harrison Ford’s Yankee-hat-wearing sidekick in “Temple of Doom.” His younger brother, David, auditioned, but Ke caught Spielberg’s eye. Quan starred in 1985’s “Goonies,” too, but found few roles after that. By the time Quan was in his 20s, he had all but disappeared from the screen. Struggling to find a foothold at a time when roles were scarce for Asian American actors, the Vietnamese-born Quan passed into “Where are they now?” territory.

Quan gave up acting. He went back to school to study film at the University of Southern California and transitioned into working behind the camera. Twenty years passed before he acted again. But when Quan was 49, he decided to give it one last go. Two weeks later, he landed his role in “Everything Everywhere All at Once.”

Now, Quan is not just a working actor again, with a string of upcoming roles, he’s being celebrated for one of the best performances of the year. He plays Waymond, the meek husband who transforms in the film’s spiraling multiverses into a fanny-pack-slinging hero and a debonair “In the Mood for Love”-style bachelor. Decades may have passed, but Quan’s sweetly sincere screen presence still shines.

The 51-year-old actor has already picked up awards from the Gotham Awards, the New York Film Critics Circle and has been nominated for a Spirit Award. After spending much of his adult life as an actor just looking for a second chance, Quan may be the favorite to win an Academy Award, for best supporting actor.

“For the longest time, all I wanted was just a job,” Quan says. “Just an opportunity to act, to show people what I can do. This movie, ‘Everything Everywhere All at Once,’ has given me so much beyond anything I could have ever asked for.”

While speaking by Zoom during his day off shooting Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Electric State” in Atlanta,” Quan’s wife was nearby off-camera urging him: “Don’t cry! Don’t cry!” Quan tried. But as he reflected on his full-circle journey, he often found it difficult.

“There are so many people out there who doubt themselves, who have dreams they’ve given up or didn’t think would ever come true,” Quan said, his voice cracking. “To those people, I hope my story inspires them.”

Remarks have been lightly edited for clarity and brevity.

___

AP: Since the release of “Everything Everywhere All at Once,” what’s this year been like for you?

QUAN: I’m cloud not nine but 18. Before it came out, I was really nervous. When I got back into acting, I didn’t tell my family. I kept it a secret from everybody. I didn’t know whether anyone would want me. I didn’t even know if I could get a job. And even after we finished the movie, I didn’t know if I was any good. That’s why I kept it away from my family because I’m thinking: “If I get fired during production, they won’t know about it.” Or, “If I suck or the movie sucks, they won’t know about it.” I told them right before our trailer came out. The day before I called my family and said, “I’ve got a little surprise for you.” I said, “I’m an actor again.” When the movie came out, they saw it and they called me. They had zero information about my role. They said, “Ke, you’re in this movie a lot!”

AP: Given your personal history, do you connect especially with the movie’s exploration of alternate realities and lives not lived?

QUAN: For the longest time, the characters I went up for didn’t have a character name, they only lasted a page or two. I thought this role was written for me. I remember reading it until 5 a.m., sitting on the sofa, imagining all the things I wanted to put into this character and the three versions of this character. I was looking out the window and I saw the sun rise. I felt like I have enough life experience now that I can do this. Right before I went to bed, reality set in. The imagination was done. I’m thinking: “There’s no way I get this role, especially having not acted in more than 20 years.” It’s impossible! How can anybody think that your first movie back, that I would have this movie as my comeback movie? At that time, I think winning the lottery would have been much easier.

When I got that wonderful phone call and heard the three words that every actor is so eager to hear, which is “We want you,” I was so happy I can’t even describe my feelings at that time. Honestly, I don’t think I could have played this character had it been offered to me 10 years ago. Everything had to happen the way it did. It’s fate.

AP: You were spectacular as a child actor. Did you ever feel it was unjust that you didn’t get more chances after that?

QUAN: In my late teens and my early twenties, when it was extremely difficult for me to get a job, I never blamed anybody. I thought I was not good enough. I thought I was not tall enough. I thought I was not good looking enough. I thought perhaps my acting wasn’t good enough, and that’s why I wasn’t landing these roles. And I was really young. I blamed myself. For the longest time, I wished I was better. Hollywood writers were just not writing roles for Asian actors. I didn’t think like that. I would always fantasize: “What would it be like for me to be in that role?” But of course, it never happened. Hollywood didn’t write roles like that for Asian actors. I didn’t know it then, so I just blamed myself.

AP: When you quit acting, had you made your peace with it? Or did you hold out some hope of returning some day?

QUAN: I struggle with that decision for at least two years. You know, the last audition that I did was for a role with no name, two lines. I walk in the room and there were 30 other Asian actors fighting for this tiny bread crumb. When I didn’t even get that, I didn’t see a future for myself anymore as an actor. I felt like time was just slipping away. I spent so much time waiting by the phone, hoping it would ring, hoping my agent would call me, hoping that one day I would get another role like Data or Short Round.

That was when I decided to enroll in USC film school. When I stepped away, I thought I stepped away for good. For the longest time, I believed that I didn’t like acting anymore, until I started seeing my fellow Asian actors succeeding. I go: “Wow, time has changed. We are getting not just very stereotypical roles but meaningful roles, meaty roles.” It wasn’t until then that that acting bug, which I buried very, very deep, started crawling back to the surface, to the point that I could not deny that urge to get back anymore. You understand, I’m not in my 20s. I’m not in my 30s anymore. I was 49 when I made that decision. It scared me. But the idea of having regret of not giving voice to that dream scared me even more.

AP: All through those years, you’ve said Spielberg has sent you an annual holiday gift. What does he send you?

QUAN: It’s always a wonderful present with a card. Every single year for the last 38 years. Every year will be different. I always look forward to that one special gift that I get from Steven. It always warms my heart that he still remembers me, that he still thinks about me when the holiday comes around. I’m always grateful to that man. Not only did he teach me so much, but he changed my life in the most wonderful way. I guess the reason why I love acting so much has a lot do with him. My first experience as an actor was on his set. I have such fond memories of that experience. That’s the reason I fell in love with acting.

AP: Have you seen him since “Everything Everywhere All at Once” came out?

QUAN: I saw Steven over Zoom during the pandemic. We did a couple of “Goonies” reunions, so that was really sweet. But ever since our movie came out, I have not seen or spoken to him. So I want to see him in person and ask him what he thinks about our movie and my performance. I hope I make him proud.

AP: You have, though, reunited with Harrison Ford. The photo taken at the D23 event probably warmed the hearts of millions.

QUAN: I also reunited with Frank Marshall and Kathleen Kennedy at the same event I saw Harrison. We all kind of had a mini-reunion. I even joked with Kathy and Frank, knowing that I’m not in “Indy 5” — they’ve already made it — I said: “Oh my gosh, it would have been so much better if Short Round was in it.” Kathy was so sweet. Kathy said, “Ke, this is so much better. What you have now is so much better.”

AP: How did you experience the response to the photo with Ford?

QUAN: I remember that day very well. It’s been 38 years. After I went out and we chatted for a little bit, we took three pictures. The first one, it was just me putting my arms around him and him putting his arm over my shoulder. In that moment, I felt so comfortable. I could not help myself but to wrap my arms around him – this man that I love dearly. Ever since it came out, the response to fans from all over the world, how they see that picture and it brings tears to their eyes – it brought tears to my eyes. I was emotional when I hugged him. And to see him smile the way he did! It was just one of those very special moments in life you don’t get very often. I will remember it as long as I live.

AP: What would an Oscar nomination mean to you?

QUAN: When I was auditioning for this movie, I prayed to get this role. I made a wish and it came true. I had my birthday in August and every year for the longest time, for as long as I live, every single year I’ve made a wish. This year I didn’t. I didn’t want to be greedy. I’ve already had everything I ever wanted as an actor with this amazing movie. Whatever happens, my dream has already come true. God, Buddha has already answered my prayer. Everything else is icing on the cake.

AP: Are you still recognized often on the street? Has this film changed how people approach you?

QUAN: Over the years, it was once every while. People recognize me, especially my voice. The question that I always get asked is: “Are you the kid from ‘Indiana Jones?'” Or, “Are you the kid from ‘Goonies?'” I’m so lucky to have been a part of those two wonderful movies. But for the longest time, I always wished that I would do something as an adult where people would recognize me. I’ve done Comic-Cons where I’ve signed autographs and pictures, but I was just a kid. Now I have that. When I go out, people say, “Wow, you’re Waymond from ‘Everything Everywhere All at Once.'”

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013, file photo, lawmaker of the extreme far-right Golden Dawn par...
Associated Press

Far-right party banned from upcoming election in Greece

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece’s parliament has banned a far-right political party led by a jailed former lawmaker from participating in the general election later this year. Parliament published the text of a legislative amendment Thursday that will disqualify the Greek National Party on the grounds that its leader has been convicted of a serious […]
1 day ago
Bottles of Pepsi are displayed in a grocery store, Ill., Thursday, Feb. 10, 2022. PepsiCo reports t...
Associated Press

Pepsi sales rise 10% in the fourth quarter on price hikes

PepsiCo reported better-than-expected sales in the fourth quarter after hiking prices for its drinks and snacks. Revenue rose more than 10% to $28 billion. That was better than the $26.8 billion Wall Street had forecast, according to analysts polled by FactSet. Pepsi’s net income fell 60% to $535 million, largely due to a $1.5 billion […]
1 day ago
FILE - Maryland Gov. Wes Moore gives his first state of the state address, two weeks after being sw...
Associated Press

Maryland governor, officials supporting abortion protections

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Maryland Gov. Wes Moore and state lawmakers are scheduled to announce support Thursday for measures protecting abortion rights, including a state constitutional amendment that would enshrine it. House Speaker Adrienne Jones and Senate President Bill Ferguson, who are both Democrats, will join the governor at a news conference to show their […]
1 day ago
Associated Press

Earthquake hits Indonesia, killing 4 as restaurant collapses

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A shallow earthquake shook Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua on Thursday, killing four people who were unable to escape when a floating restaurant collapsed into the sea. The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude 5.1 earthquake hit residential areas in Jayapura, near Papua’s northern coast and was centered at a depth […]
1 day ago
Associated Press

US, French troops in Romania hold NATO military drills

CAPU MIDIA, Romania (AP) — U.S. and French troops that are part of a NATO battlegroup in Romania will hold a military exercise on Thursday to test the 30-nation alliance’s eastern flank defenses, as Russia’s full-scale invasion of neighboring Ukraine nears its one-year anniversary. The joint combat drills at the Black Sea training range in […]
1 day ago
FILE - An electronic sign flashes "Watch for unexpected pedestrians," Dec. 20, 2022, on the highway...
Associated Press

Supreme Court might have easy outs on elections, immigration

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court soon could find itself with easy ways out of two high-profile cases involving immigration and elections, if indeed the justices are looking to avoid potentially messy, divisive decisions. Off-ramps in those cases could prove attractive in a term with no shortage of big cases that could divide the court’s […]
1 day ago

Sponsored Articles

safety from crime...

As crime increases, our safety measures must too

It's easy to be accused of fearmongering regarding crime, but Seattle residents might have good reason to be concerned for their safety.
Comcast Ready for Business Fund...
Ilona Lohrey | President and CEO, GSBA

GSBA is closing the disparity gap with Ready for Business Fund

GSBA, Comcast, and other partners are working to address disparities in access to financial resources with the Ready for Business fund.
SHIBA WA...

Medicare open enrollment is here and SHIBA can help!

The SHIBA program – part of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner – is ready to help with your Medicare open enrollment decisions.
Lake Washington Windows...

Choosing Best Windows for Your Home

Lake Washington Windows and Doors is a local window dealer offering the exclusive Leak Armor installation.
Anacortes Christmas Tree...

Come one, come all! Food, Drink, and Coastal Christmas – Anacortes has it all!

Come celebrate Anacortes’ 11th annual Bier on the Pier! Bier on the Pier takes place on October 7th and 8th and features local ciders, food trucks and live music - not to mention the beautiful views of the Guemes Channel and backdrop of downtown Anacortes.
Swedish Cyberknife Treatment...

The revolutionary treatment of Swedish CyberKnife provides better quality of life for majority of patients

There are a wide variety of treatments options available for men with prostate cancer. One of the most technologically advanced treatment options in the Pacific Northwest is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy using the CyberKnife platform at Swedish Medical Center.
‘It’s fate.’ 40 years later, Ke Huy Quan is a star, again