China to resume issuing passports, visas as virus curbs ease

Dec 27, 2022, 7:23 AM | Updated: Dec 28, 2022, 4:51 pm
A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will ...

A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

              A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents pose for selfies outside a popular bakery in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents wearing masks visit a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A police autonomous robot patrols a mall area in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A resident takes a selfie as he skates on a frozen canal near sunset in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              An officer collects passports from residents for renewal and re-applications at a community police station in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents pose for selfies outside a popular bakery in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents wearing masks visit a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A police autonomous robot patrols a mall area in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A resident takes a selfie as he skates on a frozen canal near sunset in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              An officer collects passports from residents for renewal and re-applications at a community police station in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents pose for selfies outside a popular bakery in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents wearing masks visit a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A police autonomous robot patrols a mall area in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A resident takes a selfie as he skates on a frozen canal near sunset in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              An officer collects passports from residents for renewal and re-applications at a community police station in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents pose for selfies outside a popular bakery in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents wearing masks visit a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A police autonomous robot patrols a mall area in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A resident takes a selfie as he skates on a frozen canal near sunset in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              An officer collects passports from residents for renewal and re-applications at a community police station in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents pose for selfies outside a popular bakery in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents wearing masks visit a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A resident takes a selfie as he skates on a frozen canal near sunset in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              An officer collects passports from residents for renewal and re-applications at a community police station in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A woman wearing a mask walks along a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents pose for selfies outside a popular bakery in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents wearing masks visit a mall in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              A resident takes a selfie as he skates on a frozen canal near sunset in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Residents line up at the community police station for document applications including for passports near the words "Strict law enforcement, enthusiastic service" in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              An officer collects passports from residents for renewal and re-applications at a community police station in Beijing, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2022. China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              CORRECTS DAY AND DATE IN SECOND SENTENCE - An inbound traveler prepare to cross immigrations at the Guangzhou Baiyun Airport in southern China's Guangdong province on Dec. 25 2022. The Chinese government said Tuesday, Dec. 27 it will start issuing new passports as it dismantles anti-virus travel barriers, setting up a potential flood of millions of tourists out of China for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Emily Wang Fujiyama)
            
              Passengers prepare to board a flight at the airport in north-central China's Jiangxi province on Nov. 1, 2022. The Chinese government said Tuesday, Dec. 27 it will start issuing new passports as it dismantles anti-virus travel barriers, setting up a potential flood of millions of tourists out of China for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Passengers prepare to board a flight at the airport in north-central China's Jiangxi province on Nov. 1, 2022. The Chinese government said Tuesday, Dec. 27 it will start issuing new passports as it dismantles anti-virus travel barriers, setting up a potential flood of millions of tourists out of China for next month's Lunar New Year holiday. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

BEIJING (AP) — China says it will resume issuing passports for tourism in another big step away from anti-virus controls that isolated the country for almost three years, setting up a potential flood of Chinese going abroad for next month’s Lunar New Year holiday.

The announcement Tuesday adds to abrupt changes that are rolling back some of the world’s strictest anti-virus controls as President Xi Jinping’s government tries to reverse an economic slump. Rules that confined millions of people to their homes kept China’s infection rate low but fueled public frustration and crushed economic growth.

The latest decision could send free-spending Chinese tourists to revenue-starved destinations in Asia and Europe for Lunar New Year, which begins Jan. 22 and usually is the country’s busiest travel season. But it also presents a danger they might spread COVID-19 as infections surge in China.

Travel services companies Trip.com and Qunar said international ticket bookings and searches for visa information on their websites rose five to eight times after Tuesday’s announcement. Top destinations included Japan, Thailand, South Korea, the United States, Britain and Australia.

Japan, India, Italy, South Korea and Taiwan have responded to the Chinese wave of infections by requiring virus tests for visitors from China. The United States announced Wednesday that it would require testing of all travelers from China beginning Jan. 5.

China stopped issuing visas to foreigners and passports to its own people at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020.

The National Immigration Administration of China said it will start taking applications Jan. 8 for passports for tourists to go abroad.

The agency said it will take applications to extend, renew or reissue visas but gave no indication when they might be issued to first-time applicants.

China will “gradually resume” admitting foreign visitors, the agency said. It gave no indication when tourist travel from abroad might resume.

The changes will “create better conditions for orderly cross-border travel” and “bring more benefits to global economic development,” said a foreign ministry spokesman, Wang Wenbin.

China will “work with all countries” to “restore safety and stability to global industrial and supply chains and promote world economic recovery,” Wang said.

Health experts and economists expect the ruling Communist Party to keep limits on travel into China until at least mid-2023 while it carries out a campaign to vaccinate millions of elderly people. Experts say that is necessary to prevent a public health crisis.

During the pandemic, Chinese with family emergencies or work travel deemed important could obtain passports, but some students and businesspeople with visas to go to foreign countries were blocked by border guards from leaving. The handful of foreign businesspeople and others who were allowed into China were quarantined for up to one week.

Before the pandemic, China was the biggest source of foreign tourists for most of its Asian neighbors and an important market for Europe and the United States.

The government has dropped or eased most quarantine, testing and other restrictions within China, joining the United States, Japan and other governments in trying to live with the virus instead of stamping out transmission.

Japan and India have begun requiring virus tests for travelers from China. South Korea tests all visitors with elevated temperatures. South Korea says anyone who tests positive will be quarantined at home or in a hotel for a week.

South Korean officials said possible additional measures for arrivals from China will be announced Friday.

Taiwan on Wednesday announced visitors from China will be tested starting Jan. 1.

On Monday, the Chinese government said it would scrap quarantine requirements for travelers arriving from abroad, also effective Jan. 8. Foreign companies welcomed the change as an important step to revive slumping business activity.

Business groups have warned global companies were shifting investment away from China because foreign executives were blocked from visiting.

The American Chamber of Commerce in China says more than 70% of companies that responded to a poll this month expect the impact of the latest wave of outbreaks to last no more than three months, ending in early 2023.

The government has stopped reporting nationwide case numbers but announcements by some cities indicate at least tens and possibly hundreds of millions of people might have been infected since the surge began in early October.

Experts have forecast 1 million to 2 million deaths in China through the end of 2023.

Also Monday, the government downgraded the official seriousness of COVID-19 and removed it from a list of illnesses that require quarantine. It said authorities would stop tracking close contacts and designating areas as being at high or low risk of infection.

___

AP journalist Hyung-jin Kim in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this report.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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China to resume issuing passports, visas as virus curbs ease