Dolphins, humans both benefit from fishing collaboration

Jan 29, 2023, 10:08 PM | Updated: Feb 6, 2023, 4:58 pm
In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers a...

In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)

(Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)

              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by Oregon State University, a dolphin gives a cue to a fisher at Praia da Tesoura, Laguna, Brazil
In the seaside city of Laguna, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Bianca Romeu/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2018 photo provided by Oregon State University, a group of dolphins swims towards fishers at the Tubarão river, in Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2008 photo, provided by Oregon State University, dolphin jump in front of fishermen at Praia da Tesoura, in Laguna, Brazil. In the seaside city of Laguna, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Fábio G. Daura-Jorge/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2022 photo provided by Oregon State University, fishers are positioned in line at the interaction site in Laguna, southern Brazil, waiting for bottlenose dolphins to approach. In the seaside city of Laguna, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2019 photo provided by Oregon State University, researchers use digital cameras to photograph the dolphin's dorsal fin, which can be distinguished from one individual to another. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Alexandre Machado/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by Oregon State University, in Laguna, at Praia da Tesoura, researchers have the opportunity to collect data where the dolphin-fishermen interaction takes place. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezamat/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)
            
              In this 2014 photo provided by Oregon State University, at Praia da Tesoura, in Laguna, fishers await for dolphins to signal the right moment to cast their nets. In the seaside city of Laguna, Brazil, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The research was published Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Dr. Carolina Bezama/Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina via AP)

A fishing community in southern Brazil has an unusual ally: wild dolphins.

Accounts of people and dolphins working together to hunt fish go back millennia, from the time of the Roman Empire near what is now southern France to 19th century Queensland, Australia. But while historians and storytellers have recounted the human point of view, it’s been impossible to confirm how the dolphins have benefited — or if they’ve been taken advantage of — before sonar and underwater microphones could track them underwater.

In the seaside city of Laguna, scientists have, for the first time, used drones, underwater sound recordings and other tools to document how local people and dolphins coordinate actions and benefit from each other’s labor. The most successful humans and dolphins are skilled at reading each other’s body language. The research was published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The Laguna residents work with wild bottlenose dolphins to catch schools of migratory silver fish called mullet. It’s a locally famous alliance that has been recorded in newspaper records going back 150 years.

“This study clearly shows that both dolphins and humans are paying attention to each other’s behavior, and that dolphins provide a cue to when the nets should be cast,” said Stephanie King, a biologist who studies dolphin communication at the University of Bristol and was not involved in the research.

“This is really incredible cooperative behavior,” she added. “By working with the dolphins,” the people catch more fish, “and the dolphins are more successful in foraging, too.”

Dolphins and humans are both highly intelligent and long-lived social animals. But when it comes to fishing, they have different abilities.

“The water is really murky here, so the people can’t see the schools of fish. But the dolphins use sounds to find them, by emitting small clicks,” much as bats use echolocation, said Mauricio Cantor, an Oregon State University marine biologist and study co-author.

As the dolphins herd the fish toward the coast, the people run into the water holding hand nets.

“They wait for dolphins to signal exactly where fish are – the most common signal is what locals call ‘a jump,’ or a sudden deep dive,” said Cantor, who is also affiliated with the Federal University of Santa Catarina in Florianópolis, Brazil.

The researchers used sonar and underwater microphones to track the positions of the dolphins and fish, while drones recorded the interactions from above, and GPS devices attached to residents’ wrists recorded when they cast their nets.

The more closely the people synchronized their net-casting to the dolphins’ signals, the more likely they were to trap a large catch.

So what’s in it for the dolphins?

The descending nets startle the fish, which break into smaller schools that are easier for dolphins to hunt. “The dolphins may also take one or two fish from the net – sometimes fishers can feel dolphin tugging a little on the net,” said Cantor.

The Laguna residents categorize the individual dolphins as “good,” “bad,” or “lazy” — based on their skill in hunting and affinity for cooperating with humans, said Cantor. The people get most excited when they see a “good” dolphin approaching shore.

“These dolphins and humans have developed a joint foraging culture that allows them both to do better,” said Boris Worm, a marine ecologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, who was not involved in the research.

It’s not clear how the Laguna cooperation first emerged, but it’s survived multiple human and dolphin generations – with knowledge passed down by experienced fishers and dolphins to the next generation of each species.

Still, the researchers in Brazil worry that the Laguna alliance, perhaps one of the last of its kind, may be in danger as well, as pollution threatens the dolphins and artisanal fishing gives way to industrial methods.

“Human-wildlife cooperation is disappearing because we’re decimating the wildlife populations,” said Janet Mann, a dolphin researcher at Georgetown University, who was not involved in the study.

Scientists hope that greater awareness of the unusual interspecies cooperation can help drive support to protect it. “It’s amazing that it’s lasted for over a century – can we keep this cultural tradition alive amid many changes?” said Damien Farine, a University of Zurich biologist and study co-author.

Follow Christina Larson on Twitter at @larsonchristina.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Science and Educational Media Group. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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As crime increases, our safety measures must too

It's easy to be accused of fearmongering regarding crime, but Seattle residents might have good reason to be concerned for their safety.
Comcast Ready for Business Fund...
Ilona Lohrey | President and CEO, GSBA

GSBA is closing the disparity gap with Ready for Business Fund

GSBA, Comcast, and other partners are working to address disparities in access to financial resources with the Ready for Business fund.
SHIBA WA...

Medicare open enrollment is here and SHIBA can help!

The SHIBA program – part of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner – is ready to help with your Medicare open enrollment decisions.
Dolphins, humans both benefit from fishing collaboration