NATIONAL NEWS

Ohio votes on abortion rights this fall. Misinformation about the proposal is already spreading

Sep 2, 2023, 6:06 AM | Updated: 7:20 am

FILE - A crowd cheers as Jim Caviezel speaks during a "rosary rally" on Sunday, Aug. 6, 2023, in No...

FILE - A crowd cheers as Jim Caviezel speaks during a "rosary rally" on Sunday, Aug. 6, 2023, in Norwood, Ohio. As the campaigning for and against the nation’s latest tug-of-war over abortion begins in earnest this weekend, Ohio voters are getting a different message from the measure’s opponents. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
Credit: ASSOCIATED PRESS

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

An effort to guarantee access to abortion rights in Ohio, a November ballot measure, is already fueling misleading claims about how it could influence abortion care, gender-related health care and parental consent in the state.

The proposed constitutional amendment would give Ohioans the right to make their own reproductive decisions. Backers say that since Roe v. Wade was overturned last year by the U.S. Supreme Court, the proposal would restore a commonsense abortion protection that most Ohio voters can support.

But opponents argue it would do far more than that. Ads portray the amendment as a gateway to children getting abortions and gender-related surgeries without their parents’ consent. Opponents also have falsely suggested the amendment would open doors to protecting abusers and legalizing infanticide.

The Associated Press spoke to numerous medical and legal experts, who explained what the amendment, known as Issue 1, would mean for Ohioans if it were to pass in November.

THE AMENDMENT PROTECTS OHIO’S RIGHT TO RESTRICT ABORTIONS LATER IN PRE
GNANCY

If the amendment passes, Ohio can still restrict abortion beyond the point when a fetus can survive outside the womb. With modern medicine, that point, referred to as the point of viability, is typically about 23 weeks or 24 weeks into the pregnancy.

Yet opponents of the measure argue that the proposal would still allow for abortions “up to birth” because it lets doctors decide when a fetus is viable or not, and because it has an exemption allowing later abortions to protect the life or the health of the mother.

“They could have made it clear. They could have added weeks in there for viability,” said Mehek Cooke, a lawyer working with the opposition campaign, Protect Women Ohio.

Independent medical and legal experts say this argument discounts that doctors have a duty to follow medical science.

The original language from the amendment’s backers defined fetal viability as the fetus having “a significant likelihood of survival outside the uterus with reasonable measures.”

“Obviously, it would be unprofessional for a doctor to say that a 9-month fetus had no possibility of survival outside the uterus unless there was some life-threatening birth defect,” said Dan Kobil, a constitutional law professor at Capital University Law School in Columbus, Ohio. “The rationale offered that physicians have willy-nilly ability to define viability as anything they want is inaccurate.”

Abortions later in pregnancy are exceedingly rare. In 2020, less than 1% of abortions in the United States were performed at or after 21 weeks, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The people who are getting abortions later in pregnancy are those who have incredibly heartbreaking situations, either some awful, terrible fetal anomaly that took a while to be diagnosed or some maternal medical condition that puts the mother’s life at risk,” said Mae Winchester, a Cleveland-based maternal fetal medicine specialist.

Experts say the idea of abortions “up to birth” is misleading in itself. Terminations later in pregnancy involve medication that induces birth early, which is different from a surgical abortion.

“Abortion at the time of birth, it’s literally not a thing,” Sarah Prager, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Washington, previously told the AP.

THE AMENDMENT PROTECTS PEOPLE WHO ASSIST PATIENTS — NOT PEOPLE WHO ABUSE THEM

Anti-abortion advocates have argued that the amendment “enables abusers” because it protects any person who “assists” someone in exercising their right to make reproductive decisions.

Ohio Right to Life, an anti-abortion group, reasoned in an online flyer that the amendment could therefore protect an adult man abusing a teenage girl or a teacher going behind a parent’s back.

But legal experts say these arguments would not stand up in court.

“I think that that is an incredibly creative and inaccurate reading of the amendment,” Kobil said. “Abusers do not assist their victims.”

“The idea that an abuser could, by coercing someone to obtain an abortion or to carry a pregnancy to term, somehow be protected or insulated from punishment for that coercion is simply inconsistent with the language of the second provision of the amendment,” he said.

David Cohen, a law professor at Drexel University, said the issue is straightforward. “Abuse is illegal, so abusing someone is illegal under Ohio law,” he said.

Medical experts pointed out that there is some evidence that people seek abortions because they are in abusive relationships. Research has shown that when women in physically abusive relationships are denied abortions, they are more likely to stay with their abuser.

INFANTICIDE IS ILLEGAL. THE AMENDMENT DOESN’T CHANGE THAT

An analysis of the amendment by the conservative Christian legal group Alliance Defending Freedom claims that it “opens the door to infanticide” because the proposal would block government officials from interfering with someone exercising their right to reproductive freedom.

That analysis questions whether exercising that right includes killing or neglecting a living child.

“Does it include ‘having to care for a newborn baby?’” it says. “Does it include the ‘right’ to neglect or abandon the newborn?”

Numerous legal experts said the answer to those questions is an emphatic no. Infanticide is already illegal in the U.S., they said, and the amendment doesn’t change that.

“That’s just pure nonsense,” Cohen said.

LEGAL EXPERTS SAY IT’S A STRETCH TO CLAIM THE AMENDMENT IS ABOUT GENDER-RELATED HEALTH CARE

Opponents of the abortion amendment say its protection of “reproductive” decisions is unnecessarily broad and could include gender-related health care.

Frank Scaturro, a constitutional lawyer working with Protect Women Ohio, said that under the amendment anything that alters the human reproductive system could be understood as a “reproductive decision.”

Supporters say the proposal makes no mention of gender-related health care — precisely because it’s not about that.

The ballot language specifies that it protects reproductive decisions “including but not limited to” contraception, fertility treatment, continuing one’s own pregnancy, miscarriage care and abortion.

Independent legal experts say it’s a stretch to suggest that also means gender-related health care. That legal theory has not been attempted in other states.

Tracy Thomas, a University of Akron law professor who directs the school’s Center for Constitutional Law, said the term “decision” could be essential in interpreting the language.

“A reproductive decision to me, is a decision to reproduce or not to reproduce,” she said. “The only word there that might arguably be raised (as tied to gender-related care) is fertility treatment. I think fertility treatment is IVF. It means treatment for the purpose of reproducing.”

THE AMENDMENT DOESN’T INVALIDATE PARENTAL CONSENT, THOUGH THAT COULD BE CHALLENGED IN COURT

The amendment does not change Ohio’s existing parental notification and consent law, which requires minors to have parental permission — or a judicial exception in extreme cases — in order to get an abortion.

That has not stopped the measure’s opponents from arguing that it will be challenged in court, perhaps one day leading to a decision that would make the parental consent law unconstitutional.

Their argument is based on the use of the term “individual” in the amendment, which opponents claim applies to any gender and both adults and children.

Similar arguments related to parental consent were made ahead of Michigan’s vote last year to codify abortion rights in the state’s constitution, said Jessie Hill, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law who serves as a consultant to the Issue 1 campaign.

“None of these things have come to pass,” Hill said.

To be overturned, Ohio’s existing parental consent law would have to be challenged in court and struck down by the state Supreme Court, which has a conservative majority.

___

Associated Press writer Julie Carr Smyth in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to this report.

___

The Associated Press receives support from several private foundations to enhance its explanatory coverage of elections and democracy. See more about AP’s democracy initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

National News

Associated Press

Ex-CEO of Nevada-based health care company Ontrak convicted of $12.5 million insider trading scheme

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The former CEO and chairman of Ontrak, a publicly traded health care company based in Nevada, was found guilty Friday of a multimillion-dollar insider trading scheme. A federal jury in Los Angeles convicted Terren Scott Peizer, a resident of Puerto Rico and Santa Monica, California, of one count of securities fraud […]

3 hours ago

Associated Press

Lockheed Martin subsidiaries reach $70 million settlement for claims they overcharged Navy for parts

STRATFORD, Conn. (AP) — Two Lockheed Martin subsidiaries have agreed to pay the federal government $70 million for overcharging the Navy for aircraft parts, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday. The federal agency says Sikorsky Support Services, based in Stratford, Connecticut, and Derco Aerospace, headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, knowingly entered into an improper subcontract […]

4 hours ago

Associated Press

Man accused in killing and kidnappings in Louisiana waives extradition

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A man arrested in the slaying of a Louisiana woman and abduction of her two daughters and subsequent death of one of them waived extradition Friday in federal court in Mississippi, clearing the way for his return to Louisiana to face trial. During his court appearance in Jackson, Daniel Callihan, 36, […]

4 hours ago

Associated Press

88-year-old Montana man who was getaway driver in bank robberies sentenced to 2 years in prison

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — An 88-year-old Montana man has been sentenced to two years in a federal prison medical facility for being the getaway driver in two bank robberies in Billings last summer, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Montana said. The man was sentenced Thursday after pleading guilty in February to two counts of bank […]

5 hours ago

Associated Press

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

WASHINGTON (AP) — ABC’s “This Week” — Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. ___ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Mitch Landrieu, national co-chair of President Joe Biden’s reelection campaign; Gov. Kristi Noem, R-S.D. ___ CBS’ “Face the Nation” — Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M.; former national security adviser Robert C. O’Brien; former Deputy CIA Director Michael Morell. […]

5 hours ago

Associated Press

At least 6 heat-related deaths reported in metro Phoenix so far this year as high hits 115 degrees

PHOENIX (AP) — At least six people have died from heat-related causes this year so far in sizzling metro Phoenix, where the temperatures this week hit 115 degrees Fahrenheit (46 Celsius), Arizona’s Maricopa Department of Public Health reported this week. Another 87 deaths are under investigation for possible heat-related causes through last Saturday, public health […]

7 hours ago

Ohio votes on abortion rights this fall. Misinformation about the proposal is already spreading