NATIONAL NEWS

Wisconsin Senate to vote on firing state’s nonpartisan top elections official

Sep 13, 2023, 9:07 PM

FILE - Wisconsin Elections Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe poses for a photograph outside the...

FILE - Wisconsin Elections Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe poses for a photograph outside the Wisconsin Capitol building, Aug. 31, 2020, in Madison, Wis. The Republican-controlled Wisconsin Senate is set to vote Thursday, Sept. 14, 2023, on firing the battleground state's top elections official — a move that was denounced by Democrats and is expected to draw a legal battle. (Ruthie Hauge/Wisconsin State Journal via AP, File)
Credit: ASSOCIATED PRESS

(Ruthie Hauge/Wisconsin State Journal via AP, File)

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Republican-controlled Wisconsin Senate was set to vote Thursday on firing the battleground state’s top elections official — a move that was denounced by Democrats as illegitimate and is expected to draw a legal battle.

Nonpartisan Wisconsin Elections Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe has been the subject of conspiracy theories and threats from election skeptics who falsely claim she was part of a plan to rig the 2020 vote in Wisconsin. GOP leaders have vowed to oust her before the 2024 presidential election.

Election observers have voiced concerns that replacing Wolfe with a less experienced administrator or continuing to dispute her position could create greater instability in a high-stakes presidential race where election workers expect to face unrelenting pressure, harassment and threats.

The bipartisan elections commission deadlocked in June on a vote to nominate Wolfe for a second four-year term. Three Republicans voted to nominate her and three Democrats abstained in the hopes of preventing a nomination from proceeding to the Senate for confirmation.

Senate rejection would carry the effect of firing her, but without a four-vote majority nominating Wolfe, a recent state Supreme Court ruling appears to allow her to stay in office indefinitely as a holdover.

Senate Republicans pushed ahead regardless, with Majority Leader Devin LeMahieu saying he interpreted the commission’s 3-0 vote as a unanimous nomination. The Legislature’s nonpartisan attorneys and Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul have both contested that interpretation, saying the law is clear that an elections administrator must be nominated by at least four commissioners.

Wolfe did not attend a Senate committee hearing on her reappointment last month, citing a letter from Kaul saying “there is no question” that she remains head of the elections agency. That hearing instead became a platform for some of the most prominent members of Wisconsin’s election denialism movement to repeat widely debunked claims about the 2020 election.

The Republican-led elections committee voted Monday to recommend firing Wolfe.

Biden defeated Trump by nearly 21,000 votes in Wisconsin in 2020, an outcome that has withstood two partial recounts, a nonpartisan audit, a conservative law firm’s review and numerous state and federal lawsuits.

Many Republican grievances against Wolfe are over decisions made by the elections commission and carried out by Wolfe, as she is bound by law to do. In addition to carrying out the decisions of the elections commission, Wolfe helps guide Wisconsin’s more than 1,800 local clerks who actually run elections.

Wolfe became head of the elections commission in 2018, after Senate Republicans rejected her predecessor, Michael Haas, because he had worked for the Government Accountability Board. GOP lawmakers disbanded the agency, which was the elections commission’s predecessor, in 2015 after it investigated whether former Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s campaign illegally worked with outside groups.

Since the 2020 election, some Republicans have floated the idea of abolishing or overhauling the elections commission.

Wolfe has worked at the elections commission and the accountability board for more than 10 years. She has also served as president of the National Association of State Election Directors and chair of the bipartisan Electronic Registration Information Center, or ERIC, which helps states maintain accurate voter rolls.

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Harm Venhuizen is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

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Wisconsin Senate to vote on firing state’s nonpartisan top elections official