A ravaged Quebec coast fights climate change by retreating


              Seabirds perch on a rock jutting from Bonaventure Island with Perce Rock in Perce, Quebec, Canada, in the distance, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Fog lingers along the coast of Perce, Quebec, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through bitter experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A cairn stands on the rock beach at Cap Bon Ami in Forillon National Park, Aug. 19, 2016, in Quebec, Canada. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. At Forillon, civilization has been pulled back from the water's edge where possible. (AP Photo/Cal Woodward)
            
              Tourists visit a lighthouse at Forillon National Park in Quebec, Canada, on Sept. 15, 2022, where the International Appalachian Trail from Maine ends. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. At Forillon, civilization has been pulled back from the water's edge where possible. (AP Photo/Cal Woodward)
            
              Northern gannets fly near Perce Rock just off the coast of in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A strong wind blows as a man photographs Perce Rock in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              This 1768 image provided by the U.S. Library of Congress depicts the Perce Rock when it had two natural arches, before erosion and storms collapsed one of them, leaving a pillar and single arch in Perce, Quebec, Canada. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year. (Pierre Charles Canot/Library of Congress via AP)
            
              A visitor walks on a trail bordered by wildflowers in Forillon National Park, Aug. 8, 2019, in Quebec, Canada, near the spot where International Appalachian Trail from Maine ends. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. At Forillon, civilization has been pulled back from the water's edge where possible. (AP Photo/Cal Woodward)
            
              A gannet floats along the shore of Bonaventure Island as other gannets nest on the rock face in Perce, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              A seal looks out from a rock at the base of the cliffs of Bonaventure Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec, Canada's Gaspe Peninsula, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Tourists line up on the Perce Wharf to board Croisiere Julien Cloutier tour boats in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. The Perce Wharf extends from Perce into the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of Quebec's Gaspe Peninsula. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              People walk along the beach with Perce Rock in the distance in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. After devastating winter storms several years ago that officials tied to climate change, they replenished the pebbles on the beach and let the sea shape them into a gentler slope to help absorb the impact of the waves. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Structures sit along a shoreline north of downtown Perce, Quebec, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through bitter experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Northern gannets fly near Perce Rock just after sunrise in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Two double-crested cormorants dry their wings on shoreline rocks lining the Anse-a-Beaufils warf at Perce, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through bitter experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Tourists take photographs of Perce Rock in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022, during a Croisiere Julien Cloutier boat tour. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Joel Berthelot pilots his boat along the coast of Perce, Quebec, Canada, just after sunrise, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
A ravaged Quebec coast fights climate change by retreating