A ravaged Quebec coast fights climate change by retreating


              Northern gannets fly near Perce Rock just after sunrise in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Two double-crested cormorants dry their wings on shoreline rocks lining the Anse-a-Beaufils warf at Perce, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through bitter experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Tourists take photographs of Perce Rock in Perce, Quebec, Canada, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022, during a Croisiere Julien Cloutier boat tour. Perce Rock stands as testament to the natural processes of erosion even without climate change. The massive formation sheds hundreds of tons each year. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
            
              Joel Berthelot pilots his boat along the coast of Perce, Quebec, Canada, just after sunrise, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. Against the ravaging seas, Quebec's coastal communities have learned through experience that the way to advance against climate change is to retreat. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
A ravaged Quebec coast fights climate change by retreating