Across the US, a return to democratic order. Will it last?


              FILE - Pennsylvania Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano speaks to supporters during an election night campaign event at the Penn Harris Hotel in Camp Hill, Pa., Nov. 8, 2022. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
            
              FILE - Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., questions witnesses during a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing to examine an update on the ongoing Federal response to COVID-19, June 16, 2022, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Sanders, who has raised concerns about far-right threats to democracy since before his own 2020 presidential bid, suggested that the GOP has begun to act more rationally. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
            
              FILE - Kari Lake, Arizona Republican candidate for governor, speaks to supporters at the Republican watch party in Scottsdale, Ariz., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022. Lake, has been aggressive in promoting former President Donald Trump's unfounded concerns about the extended vote-counting process, which is typical in some states. Lake is locked in a tight race that hasn't been called against Democrat Katie Hobbs. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
            
              FILE - The Capitol is seen in Washington, Nov. 11, 2022. The post-election narrative has been focused on each party’s electoral fate: Republicans were disappointed that a red wave did not materialize, while Democrats braced for the likelihood of a House Republican takeover. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Across the US, a return to democratic order. Will it last?