Across vast Muslim world, LGBTQ people remain marginalized


              FILE - Protesters clash with Turkish police during the LGBTQ Pride March in Ankara, Turkey, Tuesday, July 5, 2022. Police in Turkey's capital broke up the march and detained dozens of people. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government has shown increasing intolerance toward any expression of LGBTQ rights, banning Pride marches and suppressing the display of rainbow symbols. (AP Photo/Ali Unal, File)
            
              FILE - Protestors kiss while holding placards reading "Shoot out queer hate" and "Rights not greed" during a rally to raise awareness of the human rights situation of LGBTQ people in Qatar and FIFA's responsibility, in front of the FIFA Museum in Zurich, Switzerland, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022. An ambassador for the World Cup in Qatar has described homosexuality as a "damage in the mind" in an interview with German public broadcaster ZDF only two weeks before the opening of the soccer tournament in the Gulf state. (Michael Buholzer/Keystone via AP, File)
            
              FILE - Police officers surround the cell in a courtroom as some of 26 men, who were arrested in a televised raid last month by police looking for gays at a Cairo public bathhouse, celebrate after an Egyptian court acquitted them in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. The trial, which had caused an uproar among activists and rights groups, captured public attention after a pro-government TV network aired scenes of half-naked men being pulled from the bathhouse by police. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)
            
              FILE - A group of activists from the LGBTQ community, background, argue with opponents of their rally in which they are calling on the government for more rights in the country gripped by economic and financial crisis, during ongoing protests in Beirut, Lebanon, Saturday, June 27, 2020. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)
            
              FILE - A Shariah Law official uses a rattan cane to whip one of two men convicted of gay sex in Banda Aceh, Aceh province, Indonesia, Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Two men in Indonesia's conservative Aceh province were caned 77 times each after neighbors reported them to the Shariah Police for having sex. (AP Photo/Riska Munawarah, File)
            
              A trans woman chants the call for prayer before an early evening prayer at Al-Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. On the outskirts of the Indonesian city that's home to many universities, the small boarding school is on a mission that seems out of place in a nation with more Muslim citizens than any other. Its students are transgender women. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Trans women attend a Quran reading class at Al Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. The school whose students are transgender women is a rare oasis of LGBTQ acceptance – not only in Indonesia, but across the far-flung Muslim world. Many Muslim nations criminalize gay sex. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Nur, right, a trans woman, takes a cigarette break as other attend a Quran reading class at Al-Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. On the outskirts of the Indonesian city that's home to many universities, the small boarding school is on a mission that seems out of place in a nation with more Muslim citizens than any other. Its students are transgender women. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Trans women and activists perform an early evening prayer at Al-Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. On the outskirts of the Indonesian city that's home to many universities, the small boarding school is on a mission that seems out of place in a nation with more Muslim citizens than any other. Its students are transgender women. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Trans women attend a Quran reading class at Al Fatah Islamic school for transgender women, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. Compared to many Muslim nations, Indonesia is relatively tolerant. Scores of LGBTQ organizations operate openly, advocating for equal rights, offering counseling, liaising with religious leaders. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              A trans woman learns to read Arabic during a class at Al Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. The school whose students are transgender women is a rare oasis of LGBTQ acceptance – not only in Indonesia, but across the far-flung Muslim world. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Y.S. Al Buchory, a trans woman, smokes a cigarette during an interview, with Arabic calligraphy that reads "Allah" above an entrance at Al Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. Buchory, 55, struggled for years to cope with lack of acceptance by people around her, but now feels at home at the school. “Like a rainbow, if there are red, yellow, green colors combined, it becomes more beautiful, rather than only black and white,” she says. “We must be able to respect each other, tolerate, not interfere with each other.” (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Trans women and activists perform an early evening prayer at Al-Fatah Islamic school in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. On the outskirts of the Indonesian city that's home to many universities, the small boarding school is on a mission that seems out of place in a nation with more Muslim citizens than any other. Its students are transgender women. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Shinta Ratri, center, founder of Al-Fatah Islamic school, reads the Quran with other trans women in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. The school whose students are transgender women is a rare oasis of LGBTQ acceptance – not only in Indonesia, but across the far-flung Muslim world. Many Muslim nations criminalize gay sex. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              Shinta Ratri, founder of Al Fatah Islamic school for transgender women, speaks during an interview in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. The school whose students are transgender women is a rare oasis of LGBTQ acceptance – not only in Indonesia, but across the far-flung Muslim world. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
            
              People hold up pictures of the Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr during Friday prayers at a mosque in Kufa, Iraq, Friday, Dec. 2, 2022. Al-Sadr who announced his withdrawal from politics four months ago has broken a period of relative silence to launch an anti-LGBTQ campaign. (AP Photo/Anmar Khalil)
Across vast Muslim world, LGBTQ people remain marginalized