AP PHOTOS: East Asia marks Lunar New Year of the Rabbit


              A woman hangs a ribbon wishing for the reunification of the two Koreas on a fence as she visit the Imjingak Pavilion, near the border with the North, to celebrate the Lunar New Year in Paju, South Korea, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
            
              Worshippers wear face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus and pray for blessing at a temple on the first day of the Lunar New Year celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. Each year is named after one of the 12 signs of the Chinese zodiac in a repeating cycle, with this year being the Year of the Rabbit. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
            
              Visitors light incense as they pray on the first day of the Lunar New Year holiday at the Lama Temple in Beijing, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. People across China rang in the Lunar New Year on Sunday with large family gatherings and crowds visiting temples after the government lifted its strict "zero-COVID" policy, marking the biggest festive celebration since the pandemic began three years ago. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
            
              People wearing South Korean traditional "Hanbok" costume watch a smartphone as they visit to celebrate the Lunar New Year at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty, and one of South Korea's well known landmarks in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
            
              Visitors wearing face masks tour at Qianmen pedestrian shopping street on the first day of the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. People across China rang in the Lunar New Year on Sunday with large family gatherings and crowds visiting temples after the government lifted its strict "zero-COVID" policy, marking the biggest festive celebration since the pandemic began three years ago. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
            
              A Malaysian ethnic Chinese prays on the first day of Lunar New Year at a temple in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on Jan. 22, marking the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
            
              Women walk through decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2023. Chinese New Year falls on Jan. 22 this year, marking the start of the Year of Rabbit, according to the Chinese lunar calendar. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
            
              A woman and a child pose a souvenir photo with a rabbit shaped floral decoration at a pedestrian shopping street at Qianmen on the first day of the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. People across China rang in the Lunar New Year on Sunday with large family gatherings and crowds visiting temples after the government lifted its strict "zero-COVID" policy, marking the biggest festive celebration since the pandemic began three years ago. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
            
              Worshippers wearing face masks offer prayer at Hok Lay Kiong temple in Bekasi, Indonesia, Sunday, Jan 22, 2023. The Lunar New Year which marks the Year of the Rabbit in the Chinese zodiac. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
            
              Worshippers wearing face masks burn their first joss sticks as they offer prayer at the Wong Tai Sin Temple, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023, in Hong Kong, to celebrate the Lunar New Year which marks the Year of the Rabbit in the Chinese zodiac. (AP Photo/Bertha Wang)
            
              A woman uses her hand to smooth out decorations for the upcoming Lunar New Year that she put up on a wall at a tourist shopping street in Beijing, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023. The Year of the Rabbit officially begins on Sunday. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
            
              Worshippers wearing face masks burn their first joss sticks as they pray at the Wong Tai Sin Temple in Hong Kong, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023, to celebrate the Lunar New Year which marks the Year of the Rabbit in the Chinese zodiac. (AP Photo/Bertha Wang)
            
              Worshippers wear face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus and pray at a temple on the first day of the Lunar New Year celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. Each year is named after one of the 12 signs of the Chinese zodiac in a repeating cycle, with this year being the Year of the Rabbit. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)
            
              Chinese worshippers pray during Lunar New Year celebrations at a temple in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              A woman poses for a selfie on a bridge decorated with lanterns at a public park in Beijing on the first day of the Lunar New Year holiday, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
AP PHOTOS: East Asia marks Lunar New Year of the Rabbit