As legal pot grows, more kids sickened by edibles at home


              Candy bars marked with Colorado's new required diamond-shaped stamp noting that the product contains marijuana, are displayed in Denver on Monday, Sept. 19, 2016. State officials require the stamp to be put directly on edibles after complaints that the treats look too much like their non-intoxicating counterparts. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
            
              Marijuana edibles are displayed at a dispensary in Las Vegas on Jan. 4, 2018. The number of young kids, especially toddlers, who accidentally ate marijuana-laced treats rose sharply over five years as pot became legal in more places in the U.S., according to an analysis published Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2022, in the journal Pediatrics. (Steve Marcus=NVLVS
            
              Edible marijuana samples are set aside for evaluation at a cannabis testing laboratory in Santa Ana, Calif., on Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018. The number of young kids, especially toddlers, who accidentally ate marijuana-laced treats rose sharply over five years as pot became legal in more places in the U.S., according to an analysis published Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2022, in the journal Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
As legal pot grows, more kids sickened by edibles at home