Bali’s water crisis threatens local culture, UNESCO sites


              A fisherman rows his boat on the Tamblingan lake in Buleleng, Bali, Indonesia, Saturday, April 16, 2022. In less than a decade, Bali's water table has decreased over 50 meters (164 feet) in some areas, raising concerns that it could lead to worsening water crisis on the tropical tourist destination. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              Tourists walk near rice fields irrigated by a traditional terrace system called a "subak" in Jatiluwih in Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia, Monday, April 18, 2022. Bali faces a looming water crisis from tourism development, population growth and water mismanagement, experts and environmental groups warn. While water shortages are already affecting the UNESCO site, wells, food production and Balinese culture, experts project these issues will worsen if existing policies are not equally enforced across the entire island. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              Motorists ride past rice fields fed by a traditional terrace irrigation system called a "subak" in Jatiluwih in Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia, Monday, April 18, 2022. Bali faces a looming water crisis from tourism development, population growth and water mismanagement, experts and environmental groups warn. While water shortages are already affecting the UNESCO site, wells, food production and Balinese culture, experts project these issues will worsen if existing policies are not equally enforced across the entire island. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              A farmer work in a field with a traditional terrace irrigation system called a "subak" in Jatiluwih in Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia, Sunday, April 17, 2022. Bali faces a looming water crisis from tourism development, population growth and water mismanagement, experts and environmental groups warn. While water shortages are already affecting the UNESCO site, wells, food production and Balinese culture, experts project these issues will worsen if existing policies are not equally enforced across the entire island. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              A man collects water from the Tamblingan lake in Buleleng Bali, Indonesia, Saturday, April 16, 2022. In less than a decade, Bali's water table has decreased over 50 meters (164 feet) in some areas, raising concerns that it could lead to worsening water crisis on the tropical tourist destination. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              Tourists walk near rice fields irrigated by a traditional terrace system called a "subak" in Jatiluwih in Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia, Monday, April 18, 2022. Bali faces a looming water crisis from tourism development, population growth and water mismanagement, experts and environmental groups warn. While water shortages are already affecting the UNESCO site, wells, food production and Balinese culture, experts project these issues will worsen if existing policies are not equally enforced across the entire island. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              A man washes his face from water in Munduk, Bali, Indonesia, Sunday, April 17, 2022. In less than a decade, Bali's water table has decreased over 50 meters (164 feet) in some areas, raising concerns that it could lead to worsening water crisis on the tropical tourist destination. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
            
              A farmer works in a field with a traditional terrace irrigation system called a "subak' in Jatiluwih in Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia, Monday, April 18, 2022. Bali faces a looming water crisis from tourism development, population growth and water mismanagement, experts and environmental groups warn. While water shortages are already affecting the UNESCO site, wells, food production and Balinese culture, experts project these issues will worsen if existing policies are not equally enforced across the entire island. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Bali’s water crisis threatens local culture, UNESCO sites