‘Best Before’ labels scrutinized as food waste concerns grow


              Best when used by" information is seen on a package of crackers, Saturday, Aug. 20, 2022, in Boston.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.(AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
            
              A "best before" date is seen on a container of hummus, Saturday, Aug. 20, 2022, in Boston.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
            
              An expired "best by" date is seen on a can of garbanzo beans, Saturday, Aug. 20, 2022, in Boston.   (AP Photo/Michael DwyerAs awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
            
              A "best by" date is seen on the top of a tomato sauce can, Saturday, Aug. 20, 2022, in Boston.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
            
              A date is stamped on a container of Kimchi, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2022, in Chicago.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.  (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
            
              A "USE BY" date is stamped on two cartons of eggs, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2022, in Chicago.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
            
              A "SELL BY" date is stamped on a wrap around Manchego cheese, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2022, in Chicago.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
            
              A "SELL BY" date is circled on a half gallon of fresh squeezed orange juice, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2022, in Chicago. As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
            
              A "SELL BY" date is seen on a package of Milano cookies, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2022, in Chicago.  As awareness grows around the world about the problem of food waste, one culprit in particular is drawing scrutiny: “best before” labels. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. Unlike “use by” labels, which are found on perishable foods like meat and dairy, “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety and may encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.(AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
            
              A package of Pawsitive Bones, a dog treat, produced by Food Shift, made of ingredients that are usually discarded, is shown Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022 in Alameda, California.   "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.  (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              Patty Apple and Cristobal Salvador load boxes of produce for donation at Food Shift, a nonprofit organization that collects unwanted groceries and distributes them to the needy on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022 in Alameda, Calif.   "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.   (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              Patty Apple, right, helps load boxes of produce for donation at Food Shift, a nonprofit organization that collects unwanted groceries and distributes them to the needy on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022 in Alameda, Calif.  "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.   (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              From left, Polly Sang, Patty Apple and Jen Franco, sort and clean vegetables for donation at Food Shift, a nonprofit organization that collects unwanted groceries and distributes them to the needy on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022, in Alameda, Calif.   "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.  (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              Customer Kevin Amaral shops at a Grocery Outlet store in Pleasanton, Calif., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.  "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.   (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              Customers check out at a Grocery Outlet store in Pleasanton, Calif. on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.  "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.  (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              Customers shop at a Grocery Outlet store in Pleasanton, Calif., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.  "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              An employee stocks refrigerated items at a Grocery Outlet store in Pleasanton, Calif., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022. "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.  (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              Customer Tom Bacon looks at coffee products at a Grocery Outlet store in Pleasanton, Calif.,  on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.  "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.   (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
            
              A customer looks at refrigerated items at a Grocery Outlet store in Pleasanton, Calif.,. on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.  "Best before” labels are coming under scrutiny as concerns about food waste grow around the world. Manufacturers have used the labels for decades to estimate peak freshness. But “best before” labels have nothing to do with safety, and some worry they encourage consumers to throw away food that’s perfectly fine to eat.  (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
‘Best Before’ labels scrutinized as food waste concerns grow