Bizarre phrases riddle aid documents for Alaska Natives


              FILE - In this image provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a search and rescue and damage assessment in Deering, Alaska, shows the damage caused by Typhoon Merbok, Sept. 18, 2022. After the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive damage along Alaska's western coast last fall, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents, largely Alaska Natives, recovery financially. (Petty Officer 3rd Class Ian Gray/U.S. Coast Guard via AP, File)
            
              FILE - A home that was knocked off its foundation floats down Snake River during a severe storm in Nome, Alaska, is caught under a bridge on, Sept. 17, 2022. After the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive damage along Alaska's western coast last fall, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents, largely Alaska Natives, recovery financially. (AP Photo/Peggy Fagerstrom, File)
            
              FILE - A boat moves past a skin boat display near whale bones and an arch made of a whale jaw on the beach in a town that was known as Barrow, Alaska, Aug. 12, 2005. After tidal surges and high winds from the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive flood damage to homes along Alaska's western coast in September, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents largely Alaska Natives repair property damage. Residents who opened Federal Emergency Management Agency brochures expecting to find instructions on how to file for aid in Alaska Native languages like Yup'ik or Inupiaq instead were reading nonsensical phrases. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
            
              FILE - People take part in an Alaska Native dance Jan. 20, 2020, in Toksook Bay, Alaska, a mostly Yup'ik village on the edge of the Bering Sea. The Federal Emergency Management Agency provided financial aid applications in both Yup'ik and Inupiaq for Alaska Native speakers following a typhoon, but the translated materials were so bungled they did not make sense. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
            
              FILE - Fredrick Brower, center, helps cut up a bowhead whale caught by Inupiat subsistence hunters on a field near Barrow, Alaska, Oc. 7, 2014. After tidal surges and high winds from the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive flood damage to homes along Alaska's western coast in September, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents largely Alaska Natives repair property damage. Residents who opened Federal Emergency Management Agency brochures expecting to find instructions on how to file for aid in Alaska Native languages like Yup'ik or Inupiaq instead were reading nonsensical phrases. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull,File)
            FILE - Rep. Mary Peltola, left, D-Alaska, acknowledges audience members singing a song of prayer for her at the Alaska Federation of Natives conference in Anchorage, Alaska, Oct. 20, 2022. After tidal surges and high winds from the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive damage to homes along Alaska's western coast in September, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents -- largely Alaska Natives -- repair property damage. Residents who opened paperwork expecting to find instructions on how to file for aid in Alaska Native languages like Yup'ik or Inupiaq instead were reading bizarre phrases. Peltola, who is Yup'ik, said it was disappointing FEMA missed the mark with these translations. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen,File) FILE - Tara Sweeney, a Republican seeking the sole U.S. House seat in Alaska, speaks during a forum for candidates, May 12, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. One brochure intended for Inupiaq speakers was written instead in Inuktitut, the Indigenous language spoken on the other side of the continent, in northeast Canada. Tara Sweeney, an Inupiaq who served as an assistant secretary of Indian Affairs in the U.S. Interior Department during the Trump administration, said there should be a congressional oversight hearing to uncover how widespread this practice is. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File) FILE - In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak aircrew flies over Golovin, Alaska, to assess damage to houses and facilities, Sept. 18, 2022. After the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive damage along Alaska's western coast last fall, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents, largely Alaska Natives, recovery financially. (Petty Officer 3rd Class Ian Gray/U.S. Coast Guard via AP, File)
Bizarre phrases riddle aid documents for Alaska Natives