Border pressures migrate north as Venezuelans head to Denver


              Venezuelan immigrants, Javier Guillen, right, and Abraham Guedez, stand outside a bus station in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. They spent three months journeying to the U.S. border and arrived in Denver by bus Friday morning. They are some of nearly 4,000 migrants who came to Denver during the past month that the city is struggling to feed and shelter during a winter cold snap. (AP Photo/Nicholas Riccardi)
            
              Javier Guillen, a Venezuelan immigrant, tries to figure out how to get to a shelter in Denver shortly after stepping off a bus from El Paso, Texas, on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Denver is reeling after nearly 4,000 immigrants, most of whom are Venezuelan, arrived from the border on their own during the past month. (AP Photo/Nicholas Riccardi)
            
              A migrant rests at a makeshift shelter in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              A migrant rests at a makeshift shelter in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              A migrant looks through donated clothes at a makeshift shelter in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              Migrants pass the time at a makeshift shelter in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              Blankets and belongings are arranged at a makeshift shelter in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              Migrants rest at a makeshift shelter in Denver on Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              A migrant studies English at a makeshift shelter in Denver, Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              Miriam Jimenez, left, intake coordinator for Denver Human Services, speaks with a migrant at a makeshift shelter in Denver, Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              Joy McCalister, left, and Stevi Soles serve soup to a migrant at a makeshift shelter in Denver, Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              Donated shoes are organized at a makeshift shelter in Denver, Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
            
              A migrant looks through donated clothes at a makeshift shelter in Denver, Friday, Jan. 6, 2023. Over the past month, nearly 4,000 immigrants, almost all Venezuelans, have arrived unannounced in the frigid city, with nowhere to stay and sometimes wearing T-shirts and flip-flops. In response, Denver converted three recreation centers into emergency shelters for migrants and paid for families with children to stay at hotels, allocating $3 million to deal with the influx. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
Border pressures migrate north as Venezuelans head to Denver