California storms feed systems set up to capture rainwater


              Sunny Wang, water resources manager for Santa Monica, gestures toward reverse osmosis membranes used to purify storm and sewer water on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2023, in Santa Monica, Calif. In Santa Monica, the new water project captured nearly 2 million gallons (7,600 cubic meters) of runoff that once treated gets used for plumbing, irrigation or pumped back into the city’s aquifer. Wang said the project will eventually save an average of about 40 million gallons (151,000 cubic meters) per year. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
            
              Sunny Wang, water resources manager for Santa Monica, points to a poster that shows the city's water infrastructure Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2023, in Santa Monica, Calif. In Santa Monica, the new water project captured nearly 2 million gallons (7,600 cubic meters) of runoff that once treated gets used for plumbing, irrigation or pumped back into the city’s aquifer. Wang said the project will eventually save an average of about 40 million gallons (151,000 cubic meters) per year. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
            
              Barbara Washington Prudhomme walks around a lake at Earvin "Magic" Johnson Park in Willowbrook, Calif., on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2023. The lake is part of a system designed to filter and recycle stormwater runoff for the lake and irrigation and prevent it from washing out to sea. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
            
              Ducks swim in a lake at Earvin "Magic" Johnson Park in Willowbrook, Calif., on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2023. The lake is part of a system designed to filter and recycle stormwater runoff for the lake and irrigation and prevent it from washing out to sea. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
            
              Sunny Wang, water resources manager for Santa Monica, stands in a parking lot near the entrance to the city's underground storm and wastewater treatment facility on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2023, in Santa Monica, Calif. In Santa Monica, the new water project captured nearly 2 million gallons (7,600 cubic meters) of runoff that once treated gets used for plumbing, irrigation or pumped back into the city’s aquifer. Wang said the project will eventually save an average of about 40 million gallons (151,000 cubic meters) per year. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
            
              FILE - The Los Angeles River flows downstream in Los Angeles, Jan. 14, 2023. In Los Angeles, a complex system of dams and paved flood control channels including the river were designed to steer water away from roads and buildings and out to sea as fast as possible. But with water sources becoming scarce, efforts are underway to begin capturing and treating some of the runoff for irrigation or to inject in aquifers. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
California storms feed systems set up to capture rainwater