Cameroon becomes a go-to country for foreign fishing vessels


              Fisherman Ayafor works in his wooden engine boat in the Atlantic, near Limbe, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Fishmongers sit next to boats as they prepare freshly caught fish to be smoked on Limbe beach, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Birds fly above a boat with freshly caught fish on the beach at Limbe, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Bonga fish, commonly found in West Africa and an important source of protein for artisanal fishing communities, are held in a basket in Limbe, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Fisherman Alfred Ojah shows holds his catch after fishing for hours in the Atlantic, near Limbe, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Fishmongers from Limbe, Cameroon, and neighboring communities wait at the shore for fishing boats to arrive with their catch at the shore on Limbe, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              A fishmonger displays barracuda for sale at a fresh fish market in Limbe, Cameroon, on April 10, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Fisherman Ayafor handles a barracuda he caught in the Atlantic near Limbe, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              Local Cameroonian fishermen prepare fishing nets on their boats along the shores of Limbe beach, Cameroon, on April 12, 2022. In recent years, Cameroon has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which foreign companies can register their ships even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. But experts say weak oversight and enforcement of fishing fleets undermines global attempts to sustainably manage fisheries and threatens the livelihoods of millions of people in regions like West Africa. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
            
              A Cameroonian flag flies on a ship at the port in Douala, Cameroon, on April 10, 2022. In recent years, the country has emerged as one of several go-to countries for the widely criticized “flags of convenience” system, under which companies can - for a fee - register their ships in a foreign country even though there is no link between the vessel and the nation whose flag it flies. (AP Photo/Grace Ekpu)
Cameroon becomes a go-to country for foreign fishing vessels