Could trawler cams help save world’s dwindling fish stocks?


              Fishing boats are docked in the harbor of Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. A bevy of companies is installing high-resolution cameras on U.S. fishing boats to replace scarce in-person observers and meet new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Mark Hager, right, and Anthony Lucia, talk with captain Al Cottone as they install cameras on his fishing boat, the Sabrina Marina, in Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. "This isn't your grandfather's fishery anymore," said Cottone, who recently had cameras installed on his 45-foot groundfish trawler. "If you're going to sail, you just turn the cameras on and you go." (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Mark Hager, right, and Anthony Lucia, install a camera aboard the Sabrina Maria fishing vessel in Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. Hager's Maine-based startup, New England Maritime Monitoring, is one of a bevy of companies seeking to help commercial vessels comply with new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology overseas, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Captain Al Cottone, center, looks on as Mark Hager, right, and Anthony Lucia, install cameras on his fishing boat, the Sabrina Marina, in Gloucester, Mass., Wednesday, May 11, 2022. Hager's Maine-based startup, New England Maritime Monitoring, is one of a bevy of companies seeking to help commercial vessels comply with new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology overseas, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Mark Hager, right, and Anthony Lucia, install a camera aboard the Sabrina Maria fishing vessel in Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. Hager's Maine-based startup, New England Maritime Monitoring, is one of a bevy of companies seeking to help commercial vessels comply with new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology overseas, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              This image of a computer screen shows video footage being analyzed of a New England offshore fisherman measuring a fish, on Wednesday, July 6, 2022, in Portland, Maine,  The video was made by a camera mounted on a fishing boat. Analysts review the footage in a lab to monitor compliance with regulations aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
            
              Mark Hager reviews video footage made from a camera on a New England fishing boat at his office in Portland, Maine, Wednesday, July 6, 2022. Hager's company, of New England Maritime Monitoring, uses cameras mounted on fishing boats to provide footage that can be used to help commercial vessels comply with new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
            
              Anthony Lucia, with New England Maritime Monitoring, installs a camera on the Sabrina Marina fishing vessel in Gloucester, Mass., Wednesday, May 11, 2022. A bevy of companies is installing high-resolution cameras on U.S. fishing boats to replace scarce in-person observers and meet new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology beyond U.S. waters, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Mark Hager, right, and Anthony Lucia, install the electronics for a camera aboard the Sabrina Maria fishing boat, in Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. Hager's Maine-based startup, New England Maritime Monitoring, is one of a bevy of companies seeking to help commercial vessels comply with new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology overseas, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              A fishing net is stored aboard the Sabrina Marina as Anthony Lucia installs a camera on captain Al Cottone's boat in Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. A bevy of companies is installing high-resolution cameras on U.S. fishing boats to replace scarce in-person observers and meet new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology beyond U.S. waters, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
            
              Mark Hager, left, positions a camera with the help of Anthony Lucia, right, as captain Al Cottone watches the feed on a monitor from his boat, the Sabrina Maria, in Gloucester, Mass., May 11, 2022. Hager's Maine-based startup, New England Maritime Monitoring, is one of a bevy of companies seeking to help commercial vessels comply with new federal mandates aimed at protecting dwindling fish stocks. But taking the technology overseas, where the vast majority of seafood consumed in the U.S. is caught, is a steep challenge. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Could trawler cams help save world’s dwindling fish stocks?