Designers look to nature, landfills for new decor materials


              This combination of photos released by NEA Studio shows sconces made from dried algae from designer Nina Edwards Ankers. Ankers is one of many designers in decor and fashion who are thinking beyond traditional materials. They're finding ways to meld beautiful design with sustainable sourcing and production methods.  (NEA Studio via AP)
            
              This image released by Marte Cázarez shows four rolls of fabric in various colors, a vegan alternative to leather made from a prickly pear cactus. The plant’s mature leaves are harvested every 6-8 months without damaging the plant. (Marte Cázarez via AP)
            
              This combination of photos released by NEA Studio shows a chandelier made from dried algae from designer Nina Edwards Ankers. Ankers is one of many designers in decor and fashion who are thinking beyond traditional materials. They're finding ways to meld beautiful design with sustainable sourcing and production methods.  (Caylon Hackwith/NEA Studio via AP)
            
              This image released by Marte Cázarez shows a cactus leaf on top of a sheet of fabric, a vegan alternative to leather made from a prickly pear cactus. The plant’s mature leaves are harvested every 6-8 months without damaging the plant. (Marte Cázarez via AP)
            
              This image shows a kitchen backsplash design by Annie Hall, made with a mix of clementine, sky and robin’s egg blue glass sintered glass tiles, at a home in Medford, Mass. (Michael J. Lee via AP)
            
              This combination of photos released by NEA Studio shows a chandelier made from dried algae from designer Nina Edwards Ankers. Ankers is one of many designers in decor and fashion who are thinking beyond traditional materials. They're finding ways to meld beautiful design with sustainable sourcing and production methods.  (NEA Studio via AP)
Designers look to nature, landfills for new decor materials