Drought snarls Mississippi River transit in blow to farmers


              FILE - Dredge Jadwin, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dredging vessel, powers south down the Mississippi River, Oct. 19, 2022, past Commerce, Missouri. The lack of rainfall in recent weeks has left the Mississippi River approaching record low levels in areas from Missouri south through Louisiana, disrupting barge and other traffic along the river as the Army Corps works to keep barge traffic moving. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
            
              FILE - People walk to Tower Rock, an attraction normally surrounded by the Mississippi River and only accessible by boat, Oct. 19, 2022, in Perry County, Mo. Foot traffic to the rock formation has been made possible because of near record low water levels along the river. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
            
              FILE - James Isaacks walks where the normally wide Mississippi River would flow, Oct. 20, 2022, near Portageville, Mo. The lack of rainfall in recent weeks has left the river approaching record low levels in areas from Missouri south through Louisiana, making barge and other travel along the river more difficult. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
            
              FILE - Exposed ground is seen in a dried up river bed where the normally wide Mississippi River would flow, Oct. 20, 2022, near Portageville, Mo. The lack of rainfall in recent weeks has left the river approaching record low levels in areas from Missouri south through Louisiana, making barge and other navigation along the river more difficult. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
            
              FILE - A shipwreck is exposed along the banks of the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, due to low water levels, Oct. 18, 2022, in Baton Rouge, La. Archaeologists believe the ship is a ferry that was built in the late 1800s or early 1900s and sunk in 1915. (AP Photo/Stephen Smith)
            
              FILE - A boat navigates the Mississippi River in Vicksburg, Oct. 11, 2022. The unusually low water level in the lower Mississippi River has caused some barges to get stuck in the muddy river bottom, resulting in delays. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
            
              A man sits along Woldenberg Park by the Mississippi River in New Orleans on Oct. 19, 2022. Dry land, left, can be seen along the river. (Chris Granger/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP)
            
              Ducks fly past the Carrollton Gauge which is used by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers to monitor water levels on the Mississippi River, Oct. 20, 2022, in New Orleans. (Chris Granger/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP)
            
              FILE - People walk to Tower Rock, an attraction normally surrounded by the Mississippi River and only accessible by boat, Oct. 19, 2022, in Perry County, Mo. Foot traffic to the rock formation has been made possible because of near record low water levels along the river. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
            
              FILE - A man walking along the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, La., stops to look at a shipwreck revealed by the low water level, Oct. 17, 2022. The ship, which archaeologists believe to be a ferry that sunk in the late 1800s to early 1900s, was spotted by a Baton Rouge resident walking along the shore earlier this month. (AP Photo/Sara Cline, File)
            
              FILE - A barge maneuvers its way down the normally wide Mississippi River where it has been reduced to a narrow trickle Oct. 20, 2022, at Tiptonville, Tenn. The lack of rainfall in recent weeks has left the river approaching record low levels in areas from Missouri south through Louisiana, making barge and other navigation along the river more difficult. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
            
              FILE - People walk toward Tower Rock to check out the attraction normally surrounded by the Mississippi River and only accessible by boat, Oct. 19, 2022, in Perry County, Mo. Foot traffic to the rock formation has been made possible because of near record low water levels along the river. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
Drought snarls Mississippi River transit in blow to farmers