Dutch leader apologizes for Netherlands’ role in slave trade


              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, center, apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, right, apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Invited guests listened when Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Marian Markelo, a Winti Priest, an Afro-Surinamese traditional religion, right, listens to Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte who apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte talks to invited guests after apologizing on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Marian Markelo, a Winti Priest, an Afro-Surinamese traditional religion, right, is hugged after Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Marian Markelo, a Winti Priest, an Afro-Surinamese traditional religion, right, listens to Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte who apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte talks to invited guests after apologizing on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte apologized on behalf of his government for the Netherlands' historical role in slavery and the slave trade at the National Archives in The Hague, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. Rutte made the apology came despite some activist groups urging him to wait until next year to apologize on the July 1 anniversary of the country's abolition of slavery. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Clave, Monument for Slavery, by Alex da Silva, is seen in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              A ledger containing the names of enslaved people is shown at the National Archives in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Legislation signed on Aug. 8, 1862, abolishing slavery on July 1, 1863, is shown at the National Archives in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Clave, Monument for Slavery, by Alex da Silva, is seen in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Clave, Monument for Slavery, by Alex da Silva, is seen in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Clave, Monument for Slavery, by Alex da Silva, is seen in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
            
              Clave, Monument for Slavery, by Alex da Silva, is seen in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. The Dutch government is expected to issue a long-awaited formal apology for its role in the slave trade, with a speech by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and ceremonies in the former colonies. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Dutch leader apologizes for Netherlands’ role in slave trade