EXPLAINER: Tackling threat of mudslides in soaked California


              FILE - Search and rescue personnel scan a home in the aftermath of a mudslide, Jan. 13, 2018, in Montecito, Calif. Experts say California has learned important lessons from the Montecito tragedy, and the state has more tools to pinpoint the hot spots and more basins and nets are in place to capture the falling debris before it hits homes. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
            
              FILE - A Cal Fire search and rescue crew walks through mud near homes damaged by storms in Montecito, Calif., Jan. 12, 2018. Experts say California has learned important lessons from the Montecito tragedy, and the state has more tools to pinpoint the hot spots and more basins and nets are in place to capture the falling debris before it hits homes. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
            
              Netting made from mettle cables is visible above a creek in Montecito, Calif., on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023. With climate change predicted to produce more severe weather, officials are scrambling to put in basins, nets and improve predictions of where landslides might occur to keep homes and people safe. (AP Photo/Ty O'Neil)
            
              FILE - A bulldozer moves debris as a vehicle sits stranded in flooded water on U.S. Highway 101 in Montecito, Calif., Jan. 10, 2018. Experts say California has learned important lessons from the Montecito tragedy, and the state has more tools to pinpoint the hot spots and more basins and nets are in place to capture the falling debris before it hits homes. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
            
              FILE - A firefighter stands on the roof of a house submerged in mud and rocks, Jan. 10, 2018, in Montecito, Calif. Experts say California has learned important lessons from the Montecito tragedy, and the state has more tools to pinpoint the hot spots and more basins and nets are in place to capture the falling debris before it hits homes. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
            
              FILE - Water floods part of a road by the San Ysidro creek on Jameson Lane near the closed Highway 101 in Montecito, Calif., Jan. 10, 2023. Relentless storm from a series of atmospheric rivers have saturated the steep, majestic mountains and bald hillsides scarred from wildfires along much of California's long coastline. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
            
              FILE - Rocks and vegetation cover Highway 70 following a landslide in the Dixie Fire zone on Oct. 24, 2021, in Plumas County, Calif. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
EXPLAINER: Tackling threat of mudslides in soaked California