EXPLAINER: Threats to US election security grow more complex


              FILE - Jen Easterly, Director of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, speaks during the summer meeting of the National Association of Secretaries of State on Aug. 14, 2021, in Des Moines, Iowa. With the midterm elections just days away, Easterly and other officials say they have no evidence that election infrastructure has been altered by hostile actors to prevent voting or vote counting, compromise ballots or affect voter registration accuracy. (AP Photo/Christina Almeida Cassidy, File)
            
              FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2021 image taken from Coffee County, Ga., security video, Doug Logan, bottom, and Jeff Lenberg are seen arriving at the Coffee County elections office in Douglas, Ga. The two men were instrumental in efforts by allies of former President Donald Trump to challenge the results of the 2020 presidential election. Security video appears to show that the two men spent hours inside the county elections office over several days in January 2021. (Coffee County via AP, File)
            
              FILE - Employees test voting equipment at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department, Oct. 19, 2022, in Miami, in advance of the 2022 midterm elections on November 8. Top U.S. election security officials say protecting the nation’s voting systems has become increasingly more challenging. That’s due mostly to the embrace by millions of Americans of unfounded conspiracy theories and false claims about widespread fraud in the 2020 presidential race. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
            
              FILE - Employees test voting equipment at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department, Oct. 19, 2022, in Miami, in advance of the 2022 midterm elections on November 8. Top U.S. election security officials say protecting the nation’s voting systems has become increasingly more challenging. That’s due mostly to the embrace by millions of Americans of unfounded conspiracy theories and false claims about widespread fraud in the 2020 presidential race. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
EXPLAINER: Threats to US election security grow more complex