EXPLAINER: Why the British public is not choosing its leader


              FILE - Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson returns to 10 Downing Street after meeting with Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace, London, on Friday, Dec. 13, 2019.  Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
            
              FILE - People queue at the entrance of a polling station in London, Thursday, May 6, 2021.  Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)
            
              FILE - Ballot papers cast in the 2019 general election are counted in Islington in London, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019.  Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali, File)
            
              FILE  - A general view of the Houses of Parliament at sunrise in London, Friday, Oct. 21, 2022. Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/David Cliff, File)
            
              British opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn holds a polling card leaflet, after casting his vote in the general election, in Islington, London, England, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019.  Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis, File)
            
              FILE - A woman arrives at a polling station in London, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019.  Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis, File)
            
              FILE - The door to 10 Downing Street in London, Friday, July 8, 2022. Under Britain's parliamentary system, the public never actually votes for its prime minister. Instead, voters tick the box for a representative from their local area, who then becomes one of Britain’s 650 Members of Parliament. The party that wins a majority forms a government and puts their leader into the prime minister's seat. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)
EXPLAINER: Why the British public is not choosing its leader