Faith leaders prep for border changes amid tension, hope


              Sister Norma Pimentel, the director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley, plays with migrant children on the floor of the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas, on Dec. 15, 2022. The Catholic nun has been ministering to migrants in the area for forty years, and worries that a broken asylum system with often shifting policies creates even more tensions among migrants and makes it impossible to help them all. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              The Rev. Brian Strassburger, left, and Flavio Bravo, center, bless migrants during Mass at the Humanitarian Respite Center for migrants across the bus station in McAllen, Texas, on Dec. 15, 2022. Pregnant women are usually admitted far more quickly than others to the United States to pursue their asylum claims, but many more people are expected to cross the border if asylum policies change. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              The Rev. Louie Hotop, a Jesuit priest, center, celebrates Mass for migrants in the large room where they rest and sleep after being admitted to the United States at the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas, on Dec. 15, 2022. Dozens of migrants are allowed to enter the United States daily here on humanitarian parole or other mechanisms to seek asylum, and thousands are expected to come if asylum policies change next week. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              Gloria, a 22-year-old migrant from Honduras 8 months pregnant with her first child, sits on a cot in the Humanitarian Respite Center run by Catholic Charities across the bus station in McAllen, Texas, on Dec. 15, 2022. She holds a sign on which a visiting Catholic priest handwrote "I'm pregnant. Can you ask for a wheelchair to bring me to my gate?" after she said she was worried she didn't know how to navigate the connecting flights that will take her to an acquaintance in Florida. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              The Rev. Hector Silva points out some of the facilities in Senda de Vida 1, one of the migrant shelters he runs in Reynosa, Mexico, just across the Rio Grande River from the United States. More than 1,200 migrants, including some 200 recently arrived Russians, wait there for a chance to be admitted to the United States to seek asylum. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              Migrants from Colombia cook a dish they call "American chicken" to sell to the other 3,000 migrants crammed in tents inside the Senda de Vida 2 shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, on Dec. 15, 2022. The shelter, the second founded by an evangelical pastor on this border city, houses migrants from Haiti, Central and South America in tents pitched on concrete or rough gravel, providing only the most essential care but security from the cartels that prey on migrants left outside. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              A migrant listens to his phone by his tent in the vast, open-air shelter Senda de Vida 2 in Reynosa, Mexico, on Dec. 15, 2022. The shelter, the second founded by an evangelical pastor in this border city, houses 3,000 migrants from Haiti, Central and South America in tents pitched on concrete or rough gravel, providing only the most essential care but security from the cartels that prey on migrants left outside. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              Edimar Valera, a migrant from Venezuela, stands among drying clothes in the Casa del Migrante shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, on Dec. 15, 2022. Valera fled her country with her mother, daughter and other family members two months ago, crossing the notoriously dangerous Darien Gap. She hopes new U.S. asylum policies will allow the family to find safety with friends in McAllen, Texas, just across the Rio Grande from the shelter. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              Eslande, a migrant mother from Haiti, reads the Gospel in Creole during Mass celebrated in the Casa del Migrante shelter by three Jesuit priests, from left, the Revs. Flavio Bravo, Louie Hotop and Brian Strassburger, in Reynosa, Mexico, on Dec. 15, 2022. Nearly 300 migrants from Haiti, Venezuela, and other Latin American countries are cramming the shelter, run by Catholic nuns in this border city on the Rio Grande. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              The Rev. Brian Strassburger, a Jesuit priest, talks with Rose, a Haitian migrant holding her 1-year-old son, in the Casa del Migrante shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, on Dec. 15, 2022. Strassburger and two fellow Jesuit priests go across the border twice weekly to celebrate Mass and bring some comfort at the shelter, which is at more than double its capacity as migrants cram this border city. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
            
              The Rev. Brian Strassburger, left, and the Rev. Flavio Bravo, right, bless migrants during Mass at the Casa del Migrant shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, on Dec. 15, 2022. Both hope and tension have been rising here and the few other shelters in this border city where thousands of migrants await news of U.S. border policy changes possibly less than a week away. (AP Photo/Giovanna Dell'Orto)
Faith leaders prep for border changes amid tension, hope